IBM and Red Hat Join Forces to Power Enterprise Virtualization

by adamjollans — December 16, 2014

Adam Jollans is the Program Director  for Cross-IBM Linux and Open Virtualization Strategy
IBM Systems & Technology Group

IBM and Red Hat have been teaming up for years. Today, Red Hat and IBM are announcing a new collaboration to bring Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization to IBM’s next-generation Power Systems through Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization for Power.

A little more than a year ago, IBM announced a commitment to invest $1 billion in new Linux and open source technologies for Power Systems. IBM has delivered on that commitment with the next-generation Power Systems servers incorporating the POWER8 processor which is available for license and open for development through the OpenPOWER Foundation. Designed for Big Data, the new Power Systems can move data around very efficiently and cost-effectively. POWER8’s symmetric multi-threading provides up to 8 threads per core, enabling workloads to exploit the hardware for the highest level of performance.

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization combines hypervisor technology with a centralized management platform for enterprise virtualization. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor, built on the KVM hypervisor, inherits the performance, scalability, and ecosystem of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux kernel for virtualization. As a result, your virtual machines are powered by the same high-performance kernel that supports your most challenging Linux workloads. Read the full post »

Co-Existence of Containers and Virtualization Technologies

by Federico Simoncelli — November 20, 2014

By, Federico Simoncelli, Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat

As a software engineer working on the Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV), my team and I are driven by innovation; we are always looking for cutting edge technologies to integrate into our product.

Lately there has been a growing interest in Linux containers solutions such as Docker. Docker provides an open and standardized platform for developers and sysadmins to build, ship, and run distributed applications. The application images can be safely held in your organization registry or they can be shared publicly in the docker hub portal (http://registry.hub.docker.com) for everyone to use and to contribute to.

Linux containers are a well-known technology that runs isolated Linux systems on the same host sharing the same kernel and resources as cpu time and memory. Containers are more lightweight, perform better and allow more density of instances compared to full virtualization where virtual machines run dedicated full kernels and operating systems on top of virtualized hardware. On the other hand virtual machines are still the preferred solution when it comes to running highly isolated workloads or different operating systems than the host.

Read the full post »

Empowering OpenStack Cloud Storage: OpenStack Juno Release Storage Overview

by Sean Cohen, Principal Technical Product Manager, Red Hat — November 19, 2014
Wind Energy

 License: CC0 Public Domain

The OpenStack 10th release added ten new storage backends and improved testing on third-party storage systems. The Cinder block storage project continues to mature each cycle exposing more and more Enterprise cloud storage infrastructure functionalities.

Here is a quick overview of some of these key features.

Simplifying OpenStack Disaster Recovery with Volume Replication

After introducing a new Cinder Backup API to allow export and import backup service metadata in the Icehouse release, which allowed “electronic tape shipping” style backup-export & backup-import capabilities to recover OpenStack cloud deployments, the next step for Disaster Recovery enablement in OpenStack is the foundation of volume replication support at block level.

Read the full post »

Simplifying and Accelerating the Deployment of OpenStack Network Infrastructure

by Valentina — November 18, 2014

plumgrid logo

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The energy from the latest OpenStack Summit in Paris is still in the air. Its record attendance and vibrant interactions are a testimony of the maturity and adoption of OpenStack across continents, verticals and use cases.

It’s especially exciting to see its applications growing outside of core datacenter use cases with Network Function Virtualization being top of mind for many customers present at the Summit.

If we look back at the last few years, a fundamental role fueling OpenStack adoption has been played by the distributions which have taken the project OpenStack and helped turn it into an easy to consume, supported, enterprise-grade product.

At PLUMgrid we have witnessed this transformation summit after summit, customer deployment after customer deployment. Working closely with our customers and our OpenStack partners we can attest how much easier, smoother, simpler an OpenStack deployment is today.

Similarly, PLUMgrid wants to simplify and accelerate the deployment of OpenStack network infrastructure, especially for those customers that are going into production today and building large-scale environments.

If you had the pleasure to be at the summit you have learnt about all the new features that were introduced in Juno for the OpenStack networking component (and if not check out this blog which provides a good summary of all Juno’s networking feature).

Read the full post »

Delivering Public Cloud Functionality in OpenStack

by John Meadows, Vice President of Business Development, Talligent — November 14, 2014

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When it comes to delivering cloud services, enterprise architects have a common request to create a public cloud-type rate plan for showback, chargeback, or billing. Public cloud packaging is fairly standardized across the big vendors as innovations are quickly copied by others and basic virtual machines are assessed mainly on price. (I touched on the concept of the ongoing price changes and commoditization of public clouds in an earlier post.) Because of this standardization and relative pervasiveness, public cloud rate plans are well understood by cloud consumers. This makes them a good model for introducing enterprise users to new cloud services built on OpenStack.Enterprise architects are also highly interested in on-demand, self-service functionality from their Openstack clouds in order to imitate the immediate response of public clouds. We will cover how to deliver on-demand cloud services in a future post.

Pricing and Packaging Cloud Services
Public cloud rate plans are very popular, seeing adoption within enterprises, private hosted clouds, and newer public cloud providers alike. Most public cloud providers use the typical public cloud rate plan as a foundation for layering on services, software, security, and intangibles like reputation to build up differentiated offerings.Enterprise cloud architects use similar rate plans to demonstrate to internal customers that they can provide on-demand, self-service cloud services at a competitive price. To manage internal expectations and encourage good behavior, enterprises usually introduce cloud pricing via a showback model which does not directly impact budgets or require exchange of money. Users learn cloud cost structures and the impact of their resource usage. Later, full chargeback can be applied where internal users are expected to pay for services provided.

Read the full post »

OpenStack 2015 – The Year of the Enterprise?

by Nir Yechiel — November 10, 2014

OpenStackSummit Paris 2014This post is the collective work of all the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform Product Managers who attended the summit.

The 11th Openstack design summit that took place last week for the first time in Europe, brought about 6000 participants of the OpenStack community to Paris to kick off the design for the “Kilo” release.

If 2014 was the year of the “Superuser”, then clearly the year 2015 seems to be about the “Year of the Enterprise“.  The big question is: are we ready for enterprise mass adoption?

More than year ago, at the Openstack Havana design summit, it was clear that although interest in deploying OpenStack was growing, most enterprises were still holding back, mainly due to the lack of maturity of the project. This OpenStack summit, the new cool kid in the Open Cloud infrastructure playground is finally starting to show real maturity signs.

An important indicator for this is the increased number of deployments. The Kilo summit showcased about 16 different large organizations using production workloads on OpenStack, including companies such as BBVA Bank, SAP SE (formerly SAP AG) & BMW.

Read the full post »

OpenStack Summit – Why NFV Really Matters

by David H. Deans — November 6, 2014

I’ve been following the news releases and other storylines that have emerged from the ongoing proceedings at the OpenStack Summit in Paris, France. Some key themes have surfaced. In my first editorial, I shared reasons why the market has matured. In my second story, I observed how simplification via automation would broaden the addressable market for hybrid cloud services.

The other key theme that has emerged is the increased focus on telecom network operator needs and wants – specifically, the primary telco strategies that are evolving as they continue to build-out their hyperscale cloud infrastructures.

This is my domain. I’ve invested most of my professional life working for, or consulting with, domestic and international communication service providers. I’ve been actively involved in the business development of numerous wireline and wireless services, within both the consumer and commercial side of the marketplace. During more than two decades of experience, it’s been an amazing journey.

The closely related Technology, Media and Telecommunications (TMT) industries are already undergoing a transformation, as innovative products or services are developed by collaborative teams of creative contributors and brought to market at an accelerated rate.

Read the full post »

Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure 5 Now Available

by Maria Gallegos, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — November 5, 2014

Gordon Tillmore, Red Hat
Earlier this week, we announced the release of Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure 5.  Customers can use  this recent release to move towards open hybrid cloud working alongside existing infrastructure investments, and allowing for workload portability from a customer’s private cloud to Amazon EC2, or the reverse, if desired.   The product is our Infrastructure-as-a-Service solution providing:

  • a flexible and open solution to build out a centrally managed heterogeneous virtualization environment,
  • a private cloud for traditional workloads based on virtualization technologies, and
  • a massively scalable OpenStack-based cloud for cloud-enabled workloads

Version 5 -an important release for Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure
Version 4 already included three tightly integrated Red Hat technologies: Red Hat CloudForms, an award winning Cloud Management Platform (CMP), Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, a full-featured enterprise virtualization solution, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, our fully supported, enterprise grade OpenStack offering.  Red Hat Enterprise Linux has also been a key ingredient, serving as the basis for Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization and Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, as well as a guest operating system at the tenant layer. And now, with Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure 5, Red Hat is introducing Satellite 6 to it’s award winning cloud infrastructure. Satellite 6 is accessible with no extra cost, to help organizations better manage the lifecycle of their cloud infrastructure.

Read the full post »

OpenStack, Paris Summit: Day One Insights

by David H. Deans — November 4, 2014

Depending on your point of view, there are different ways to assess the progress of the evolving OpenStack project. Yesterday, I profiled “three reasons” why I believe there are encouraging signs that demonstrate how OpenStack has matured — and I gave an example of existing application case studies, as a key indicator.

I prefer to view the OpenStack upside potential through the lens of a business innovation consultant, where the technology is a means to an end – that being a desired commercial transformation. I referred to “superior digital business processes” as a primary motivation for exploring cloud computing services. So, what do I foresee, and how did I become fascinated by this particular topic?

I believe that today’s Global Networked Economy will lower any remaining geographic boundaries that may have previously limited competition in those industries that, to date, were largely untouched by the disruption made possible by the public Internet. The nascent Internet of Things has my attention – I want to be prepared for whatever comes next.

Freedom to Innovate with Cloud Services

Read the full post »

Three Reasons Why OpenStack has Matured

by David H. Deans — November 3, 2014

The OpenStack Summit, taking place in Paris, France this week, will be a turning point for those of us that study market development activity within the cloud computing infrastructure marketplace. I attended my first OpenStack Summit earlier this year, in Atlanta, Georgia. During the event conference sessions, I was immediately engaged by the apparent enthusiasm and energy of the other attendees.

You know, it’s true; people that are driven by a strong sense of purpose really do radiate a high level of passion for their cause that can become somewhat contagious. It’s hard to resist a positive outlook.

That said, I’m not easily swayed by buzz or hype. As a consultant with nearly three decades of technology business experience, I tend to carefully consider all the facts before I offer an opinion. Most of my experience is within the telecom sector, so I was drawn to the conference sessions that focused on the business challenges that I knew very well. Upon returning home from the Atlanta Summit, I wrote a story about my observations; it was entitled “Exploring OpenStack cloud case studies.”

How the OpenStack Market has Evolved

I’ve observed several encouraging developments since the Atlanta Summit that I believe demonstrate the OpenStack market has now matured to a point where the next wave of enterprise user adoption will start to occur. As we enter 2015, I’ll also share periodic updates on my market assessment.

In the past, there have been numerous reports in the trade media that a lack of skilled and experienced cloud-savvy technical talent has limited some IT organizations from acting on the cloud service pilot request of an internal constituent. This scenario has helped to fuel the Shadow IT phenomena, where public cloud services are procured and used directly by impatient Line of Business (LoB) leaders.

Vendors in the cloud computing community have responded, by offering the support resources required by CIOs and IT managers – essentially creating the environment to address the staffing and skills demand in the marketplace. As an example, more OpenStack training classes are now available, and the associated skills certification process ensures that the graduating students are prepared for the most common use cases. Read the full post »

Red Hat, Nuage Networks, OpenStack, and KISS

by Scott Drennan — October 29, 2014
and Nir Yechiel

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The reality is that IT is serious money – IDC estimates that the Internet of Things (IoT) market alone will hit $7.1 trillion by 2020![1]  But a lot of that money is due to the IT industry practice of “lock-in” – trapping a customer into a proprietary technology and then charging high costs, in some instances up to 10X cost, for every component   For some reason, customers object to having to pick one vendor’s approach, being subject to limitations – whether technological or otherwise, paying high markups for every incremental extension, then having to pay high switching costs for the next solution at end of life in five years or less.

As a consequence, many of those customers are taking a good, hard look at open source software (OSS) that can minimize vendor lock-in. OSS communities also encourage the development of software solutions that run on industry-standard and reasonably priced hardware. In particular, OpenStack has been well received by businesses of all sizes, and the OpenStack community is growing by leaps-and-bounds with 625% more participating developers and 307% more business members as of its fourth birthday![2] Since OpenStack can orchestrate operations for an entire datacenter, it offers a vision of the future where  customers are free from server, network, and storage lock-in.

However, legacy naysayers have always articulated three catches with OSS:
1)    Making it enterprise-grade in terms of scalability, reliability, and security
2)    Ensuring that the code base grows over time so that others can move the ball forward
3)    Getting enterprise-class support for the code base Read the full post »

Delivering the Complete Open-Source Cloud Infrastructure and Software-Defined-Storage Story

by neilwlevine — October 24, 2014

Authored by Neil Levine, Director Product Marketing, Red Hat and Sean Cohen, Principal Technical Product Manager, Red Hat

The OpenStack summit in Paris not only marks the release of Juno to the public but also the 6 month mark since Red Hat acquired Inktank, the commercial company behind Ceph. The acquisition not only underscored Red Hat’s commitment to use open source to disrupt the storage market, as it did in the operating system market with Linux, but also its investment in OpenStack where Ceph is a market leading scale-out storage platform, especially for block.

Even prior to the acquisition, Inktank’s commercial product – Inktank Ceph Enterprise – had been certified with Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform and over the past 6 months, the product teams have worked to integrate the two products even more tightly.
Delivering the complete Open-Source Cloud Infrastructure and Software-Defined-Storage story
The first phase of this work has been focused on simplifying the installation experience. The new Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform installer now handles configuration of the Ceph components on the controller and compute side, from installing the packages to configuring Cinder, Glance and Nova to creating all the necessary authentication keys. With the Ceph client-side components now directly available in RHEL OpenStack Platform, much of what was a manual effort has now been transformed & automated. In addition the RHEL OpenStack Platform installer also takes responsibility for the configuration of the storage cluster network topology and will boot and configure the hosts that will be used by the Ceph storage cluster.

The Inktank Ceph Enterprise installer has also been modified to take pre-seeded configuration files from RHEL OpenStack Platform and use them to build out the storage cluster. With some of the Ceph services architected to run co-resident on the controller nodes, the number of physical nodes needed has been reduced without sacrificing security of performance.
Read the full post »

OpenStack Summit Paris: Agenda Confirms 22 Red Hat Sessions

by Jeff Jameson, Sr. Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — September 26, 2014

As this Fall’s OpenStack Summit in Paris approaches, the Foundation has posted the session agenda, outlining the schedule of events. With an astonishing 1,100+ sessions submitted for review, I was happy to see that Red Hat and eNovance have a combined 22 sessions that are included in the weeks agenda, with two more as alternates.

As I’ve mentioned in the past, I really respect the way the Foundation goes about setting the agenda – essentially deferring to the attendees and participants themselves, via a vote. Through this voting process, the subjects that are “top-of-mind” and of most interest in learning more about are brought to the surface, resulting in a very current and cutting edge set of discussions. And with so many accepted sessions, it again confirms that Red Hat, and now eNovance, are involved in some of the most current projects and technologies that the community is most interested in. Read the full post »

Free webinar on the Heat orchestration service

by Maria Gallegos, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat —

On Tuesday, September 30, we will presenting a Taste of Red Hat Training webinar dedicated to Heat, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform orchestration service that allows you to run multiple composite cloud applications. There will be two live sessions of the webinar run that day, at 9 am EST and 2 pm EST to accommodate the usual international audience.

Join Red Hat curriculum developer, Adolfo Vazquez, as he teaches you about the basics of the Heat orchestration service in Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, the Heat core services, and how to configure applications on the OpenStack infrastructure. Content for the webinar is pulled directly from our popular Red Hat OpenStack Administration (CL210) course.

Click here for more information and to register.

Announcing Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta

by Raissa Tona, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — September 18, 2014

Today, we are excited to announce the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta to existing Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization customers. The Beta release allows our customers to easily manage and automate many virtualization tasks while providing an on-ramp to accommodate cloud enabled workloads based on OpenStack. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta provides new features across compute, storage, network, and infrastructure.

One key feature to highlight is the full integration with OpenStack Glance and Neutron services. This feature was previously in tech preview. The strong integration between Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization and OpenStack enables customers to eliminate silos and scale up to meet business demands.

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta is available to all existing customers with active Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization subscriptions today. Please view the 3.5 Beta Installation Guide here for details on how to start testing the beta release.

Please note that RHEV 3.5 Beta 1 will not support the use of the RHEV-H Hypervisor and will only support the use of a RHEL Hypervisor Host.  We apologize for this delay, and plan on the RHEV-H Hypervisor to be available in the RHEV 3.5 Beta 2 refresh.

Also note that there was a last second issue identified with the dwh component that prevents its installation in RHEV 3.5 Beta 1.  This will be resolved in the RHEV 3.5 Beta 2 refresh.

What’s Coming in OpenStack Networking for Juno Release

by Nir Yechiel — September 11, 2014

Neutron, historically known as Quantum, is the OpenStack project focused on delivering networking as a service. As the Juno development cycle ramps up, now is a good time to review some of the key changes we saw in Neutron during this exciting cycle and have a look at what is coming up in the next upstream major release which is set to debut in October.

Neutron or Nova Network?

The original OpenStack Compute network implementation, also known as Nova Network, assumed a basic model of performing all isolation through Linux VLANs and iptables. These are typically sufficient for small and simple networks, but larger customers are likely to have more sophisticated network requirements. Neutron introduces the concept of a plug-in, which is a back-end implementation of the OpenStack Networking API. A plug-in can use a variety of technologies to implement the logical API requests and offer a rich set of network topologies, including network overlays with protocols like GRE or VXLAN, and network services such as load balancing, virtual private networks or firewalls that plug into OpenStack tenant networks. Neutron also enables third parties to write plug-ins that introduce advanced network capabilities, such as the ability to leverage capabilities from the physical data center network fabric, or use software-defined networking (SDN) approaches with protocols like OpenFlow. One of the main Juno efforts is a plan to enable easier Nova Network to Neutron migration for users that would like to upgrade their networking model for the OpenStack cloud.

Performance Enhancements and Stability

The OpenStack Networking community is actively working on several enhancements to make Neutron a more stable and mature codebase. Among the different enhancements, recent changes to the security-group implementation should result in significant improvement and better scalability of this popular feature. To recall, security groups allows administrators and tenants the ability to specify the type of traffic and direction (ingress/egress) that is allowed to pass through a Neutron port, effectively creating an instance-level firewall filter. You can read this great post by Miguel Angel Ajo, a Red Hat employee who led this effort in the Neutron community, to learn more about the changes.

In addition, there are continuous efforts to improve the upstream testing framework, and to create a better separation between unit tests and functional tests, as well as better testing strategy and coverage for API changes.
Read the full post »

OpenStack Resources for the vAdmin

by Raissa Tona, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — September 8, 2014

Across many enterprise organizations, IT is driving innovation that allows companies to be more agile and gain a competitive edge. These are exciting times for the Vadmins who are at the center of this change. This innovation starts with bridging the gap between traditional virtualization workloads and cloud-enabled workloads based on OpenStack.

Organizations are embracing OpenStack because it allows them to more rapidly scale to meet evolving user demands without sacrificing performance on a stable and flexible platform and at a cost effective level.

As a Vadmin, you might be asking yourself how OpenStack fits in your world of traditional virtualization workloads. The answer is that OpenStack is not a replacement rather it is an extension to traditional virtualization platforms.

To help vAdmins get started with OpenStack, we have created a dedicated page with numerous OpenStack resources including a solutions guide that explains the architectural differences between OpenStack and VMware vSphere, as well as an appliance that allows you to quickly run and deploy OpenStack in your VMware vSphere environment.

Visit this OpenStack Resources vAdmin page to learn how to get started with OpenStack in your existing infrastructure today.

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4.1 Released

by Scott Herold — August 25, 2014

Principal Product Manager, Red Hat

I don’t often find myself getting overly excited about maintenance releases, however Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4.1 is an exception due to two key factors:

  • Preview support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as a hypervisor host
  • Support for up to 4,000 GB memory in a single virtual machine

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4, originally introduced official guest operating system support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7. In continuing down the path of providing the latest Red Hat technologies to our customers, I am proud to announce that Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4.1 has preview support for RHEL 7 as a hypervisor.  Red Hat customers with active subscriptions will be able to take advantage of using RHEL 7 as a hypervisor either as a RHEL host, or by using our thin Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor image.

Read the full post »

Juno Updates – Security

by Jeff Jameson, Sr. Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — August 5, 2014

Written by Nathan Kinder

 

There is a lot of development work going on in Juno in security related areas. I thought it would be useful to summarize what I consider to be some of the more notable efforts that are under way in the projects I follow.

Keystone

Nearly everyone I talk with who is using Keystone in anger is integrating it with an existing identity store such as an LDAP server. Using the SQL identity backend is really a poor identity management solution, as it only supports basic password authentication, there is lack of password policy support, and the user management capabilities are fairly limited. Configuring Keystone to use an existing identity store has it’s challenges, but some of the changes in Juno should make this easier. In Icehouse and earlier, Keystone can only use one single identity backend. This means that all regular users and service users must exist in the same identity backend. In many real-world scenarios, the LDAP server used for users and credentials is considered to be read-only by anything other than the normal user provisioning tools. A common problem is that the OpenStack service users are not wanted in the LDAP server. In Juno, it will be possible to configure Keystone to use multiple identity backends. This will allow a deployment to use an LDAP server for normal users and the SQL backend for service users. In addition, this should allow multiple LDAP servers to be used by a single Keystone instance when using Keystone Domains (which previously only worked with the SQL identity backend).

Read the full post »

Session Voting Now Open, for OpenStack Summit Paris!

by Jeff Jameson, Sr. Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — July 31, 2014

The voting polls for speaking sessions at this Fall’s OpenStack Summit in Paris, France are now open to the public. This time around it seems Red Hatters are looking to participate in more sessions then any previous Summit, helping to share innovation happening at Red Hat and in the greater community.

With an incredible quantity of sessions submitted this Summit, we’ve got quite a diverse selection for you to vote on. Spanning from low-level core compute, networking, and storage sessions, to plenty of customer success stories and lessons learned.


Each and every vote counts, so please have a look through the Red Hat submitted sessions below and vote for your favorites! If you’re new to the voting process, you must sign up for a free OpenStack Foundation member username and cast your votes. Visit the foundation site here, to sign up for free!

Once you’ve signed up as a member, click on the titles below to cast your vote. Remember, voting closes on Wednesday August 6th.

Have a look at our sessions here and cast your vote! I’ve sorted by category:

Storage

  1. OpenStack Storage APIs and Ceph: Existing Architectures and Future Features
  2. Deployment Best Practices for OpenStack Software-Defined Storage with Ceph
  3. What’s New in Ceph?
  4. OpenStack and Ceph – Match Made in the Cloud
  5. Large Scale OpenStack Block Storage with Containerized Ceph
  6. Red Hat Training: Using Ceph and Red Hat Storage Server in Cinder
  7. Volume Retyping and Cinder Backend Configuring
  8. Using OpenStack Swift for Extreme Data Durability
  9. Ask the Experts: Challenges for OpenStack Storage
  10. Deploying Red Hat Block and Object Storage with Mellanox and Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform
  11. Vanquish Performance Bottlenecks and Deliver Resilient, Agile Infrastructure, with All Flash Storage and OpenStack
  12. GlusterFS: The Scalable Open Source Backend for Manila
  13. Delivering Elastic Big Data Analytics with OpenStack Sahara and Distributed Storage
  14. Deploying Swift on a Scale-Out File System

Read the full post »

Juno Preview for OpenStack Compute (Nova)

by russellbryant — July 10, 2014

Originally posted on blog.russellbryant.net.

We’re now well into the Juno release cycle. Here’s my take on a preview of some of what you can expect in Juno for Nova.

NFV

One area receiving a lot of focus this cycle is NFV. We’ve started an upstream NFV sub-team for OpenStack that is tracking and helping to drive requirements and development efforts in support of NFV use cases. If you’re not familiar with NFV, here’s a quick overview that was put together by the NFV sub-team:

NFV stands for Network Functions Virtualization. It defines the
replacement of usually stand alone appliances used for high and low
level network functions, such as firewalls, network address translation,
intrusion detection, caching, gateways, accelerators, etc, into virtual
instance or set of virtual instances, which are called Virtual Network
Functions (VNF). In other words, it could be seen as replacing some of
the hardware network appliances with high-performance software taking
advantage of high performance para-virtual devices, other acceleration
mechanisms, and smart placement of instances. The origin of NFV comes
from a working group from the European Telecommunications Standards
Institute (ETSI) whose work is the basis of most current
implementations. The main consumers of NFV are Service providers
(telecommunication providers and the like) who are looking to accelerate
the deployment of new network services, and to do that, need to
eliminate the constraint of slow renewal cycle of hardware appliances,
which do not autoscale and limit their innovation.

NFV support for OpenStack aims to provide the best possible
infrastructure for such workloads to be deployed in, while respecting
the design principles of a IaaS cloud. In order for VNF to perform
correctly in a cloud world, the underlying infrastructure needs to
provide a certain number of functionalities which range from scheduling
to networking and from orchestration to monitoring capacities. This
means that to correctly support NFV use cases in OpenStack,
implementations may be required across most, if not all, main OpenStack
projects, starting with Neutron and Nova.

Read the full post »

OpenStack Summit, Atlanta 2014: Year of the superuser?

by Steve Gordon, Product Manager, Red Hat — June 3, 2014

The OpenStack community gathered recently in Atlanta to define the roadmap for the upcoming Juno release cycle and reflect on Icehouse. Icehouse is the release that forms the basis of the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5, a beta for which was announced during the week.

The biannual summit moved back to North America and again increased in size with some 4500 stackers in attendance, up from 3500 in Hong Kong only six months ago. The OpenStack Foundation again handled this with aplomb, organizing an excellent event in the spacious Georgia World Congress Center.

2014, year of the superuser?

The increased presence of OpenStack superusers at this summit was hard to miss with several keynote appearances including AT&T, Disney, Sony, and Wells Fargo as well as many other users leading or participating in general summit sessions. A convenient youtube playlist listing these user-led sessions has since been made available. The OpenStack Foundation also recently launched the superuser.openstack.org publication to coincide with this renewed push to bring users forward.

 

Read the full post »

Open, modular architecture brings flexibility and agility to the data center

by Shashi Sastry, Senior Product Manager, Nuage Networks — May 15, 2014

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Recently there has been a flurry of activity in the Open Source community – blog posts, articles, tweets. The discussion is about Application deployment and Policy enforcement in the data center. Why all the banter?  Reason – it is simpler for developers to set up services using an application-centric view rather than a network-centric view; and it allows them to do so without sacrificing application or data security. Nuage Networks has been a strong advocate of an Application Centric Policy framework. As a result, the Nuage Virtualized Services Platform (VSP) supported integrated policy from day one when we launched our product a year ago. We have continued to enhance this policy framework, which aligns with the current trends.

Figure 1 Application Centric view for a three tier application framework

Figure 1: Application Centric view for a three tier application framework

We are delighted that the Open Source community is beginning to share our point of view. This is reflected with the Neutron Group Policy extension work in OpenStack. Nuage is strongly committed to supporting this effort by contributing to the Neutron Core development. As part of this effort, we will also be providing support for Nuage VSP as a Network Policy provider in OpenStack Read the full post »

Is the next battle in the Cloud Price War going to end up in your datacenter?

by John Meadows, Vice President of Business Development, Talligent — May 14, 2014

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Why you need billing and chargeback for Openstack and what to expect from Red Hat and Talligent.

There is a cloud price war going on and the impact is felt across all IT service delivery, public and private.  The big players such as Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and Centurylink, have all recently announced dramatically lower prices and new functionality. Market pundits expect that these announcements are just the beginning of falling prices as cloud providers move to take advantage of the massive shift of IT services to the cloud and work to grab market share.

Read the full post »

Why Brocade’s Close Collaboration With Red Hat Matters To Your Business

by Lisa Caywood, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Brocade — May 13, 2014

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Cloud.
Open.
Software-Defined.

These are the hot buzzwords of the last year or two, yes, but not without cause. Cloud is finally becoming real, albeit a bit differently than many envisioned a few years ago: the relative aggressiveness of public providers compared to most enterprises has created a functional chasm that small and midsize enterprises are unlikely, at this point, to try to fill—it’s easier to outsource many workloads.

The economic realities of the cloud marketplace dictate that service agility trumps almost everything else. Until very recently, this could be accomplished via tight (and expensive, and often lengthy) integration between the physical infrastructure and some sort of cloud management framework, most of which were retrofitted to deal with VMs. Generally the best way to make this work was rigorous standardization of the physical infrastructure. Read the full post »

Sahara: OpenStack Elastic Hadoop on Demand

by Sean Cohen, Principal Technical Product Manager, Red Hat — May 12, 2014
“When elephants cross the world's hottest desert…”

“When elephants cross the world’s hottest desert…”

Introduction
Anyone who is serious about big data, scale out applications and cloud infrastructure should want to intimately understand the benefits of scale out architecture and the resource elasticity of cloud services. As we continue our evolution into a deeper understanding of data, we see a need agile access to an elastic big data platform. Such a platform can allow us to capture, synthesize and quantify data into business value.

Enter OpenStack Sahara – the intersection of Hadoop and OpenStack.

As an OpenStack project started by Red Hat, Mirantis and Hortonworks during the OpenStack Havana summit in Portland, Sahara was incubated for the OpenStack Icehouse release and is expected to be integrated for OpenStack Juno by the end of 2014.

Sahara’s mission is to provide a scalable data processing stack and associated management interfaces. Sahara delivers on that mission by providing the ability to rapidly create and manage Apache Hadoop™ clusters and easily run workloads across them. All on OpenStack managed infrastructure, without having to deal with the details of cluster management.

With full cluster lifecycle management, provisioning, scaling and termination, Sahara allows the user to select different Hadoop versions, cluster topology and node hardware details. Read the full post »

The Evolution of an Ecosystem: Why Certified Partners are Critical

by Maria Gallegos, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat —

RHOSCIPN_logo_smallBy Mike Werner, Senior Director of Global Technology Ecosystems, Red Hat

 

Customers evolving toward an open, cloud-enabled IT can enjoy  OpenStack’s benefits: broad industry support, vendor neutrality, fast-paced innovation. As they move into implementation, their requirements for OpenStack solutions often share a familiar theme: enterprise-ready, fully supported, well-integrated products. The right answer should require all layers, from hardware to applications, to interoperate to add value but not complexity. This approach mandates collaboration from multiple vendors, and alignment on business and technology. In other words, a platform ecosystem.

How do we build such an ecosystem for the cloud?

We start with the solid underpinning of the OpenStack project, with its large community of technology players working on continuous testing and integration of their components, such as Networking plugins and Storage drivers.
Read the full post »

Build a foundation for your private cloud – A Red Hat Summit session recap

by Raissa Tona, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — May 9, 2014

Red Hat Summit 2014 marked the 10th anniversary for the annual Red Hat conference. The Summit offers an opportunity for our customers, partners, and other stakeholders to interact face to face with Red Hatters who bring to life some of the products that help their organizations to innovate and to gain a competitive edge. Speaking of customers, I was privileged to moderate a panel titled “Build a foundation for your private cloud”. The panelists included Nirmal Mehta, Lead Technologist, Booz Allen Hamilton; Bernard Lee, Group head of IT and VP of Process and Innovation, YTL Power; Melvin Soh, Manager, High Performance Computing Centre, Nanyang Technical University; and Venkatesh Jakka, Manager, Systems, Chicago Board of Exchange.

Read the full post »

OpenStack Summit Breakout Sessions – Update

by Steve Gordon, Product Manager, Red Hat — May 6, 2014

Previously, we announced the 20 sessions at OpenStack Summit Atlanta that feature Red Hat speakers. In addition to these 20 sessions throughout the week, Red Hat will also have a dedicated track for the full day on Monday May 12th from 11:15am to 6:10pm, in room B312. Here, you’ll be able to learn more about the specific efforts Red Hat is making around our commercially supported OpenStack products and joint partner solutions.

Below are the sessions we will be presenting in our breakout room, with Red Hat speakers as well as partners and customers. We encourage you to explore the agenda on the OpenStack schedule builder by going to http://openstacksummitmay2014atlanta.sched.org/?s=B312

Space is limited and schedules are filling up, so please sure to reserve your space soon!

Filling the Management Gap: Cloud Management Platforms for Managing OpenStack and Other Cloud Infrastructures
In this session, you will learn how cloud management platforms bring critical management capabilities like chargeback/showback, configuration and lifecycle management, orchestration, automation, and governance driven by IT-defined policies, and capacity and utilization reporting to your OpenStack deployment.

  • Monday 11:15-11:55am
  • Brad Ascar, Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat

Read the full post »

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC – Available Now

by Steve Gordon, Product Manager, Red Hat — May 2, 2014

As mentioned during Red Hat Summit 2014, we are excited to announce that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Release Candidate (RC) is now publicly available for testing. A pre-release build of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC offers a near-final look at Red Hat’s flagship operating system crafted for the open hybrid cloud, building upon the feedback collected during the beta program for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

In addition to the installation media and packages a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC cloud guest image in QCOW2 format, suitable for use with KVM hypervisors as used in the majority of OpenStack clouds, is also available.

Want to test out the latest OpenStack release, Icehouse, on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC? The RDO community has you covered, follow the Quickstart to install the recently announced RDO Icehouse packages on your Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 RC, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, or Fedora 20 system. As well as previously noted changes to compute, storage, and networking functionality OpenStack Icehouse includes these newly integrated services:

  • Sahara – Data processing service
  • Trove – Database-as-a-Service

The design and planning of the updates to these and other services for the next OpenStack release, Juno, are slated to take place at the OpenStack Summit May 2014 in Atlanta – that’s right, from Icehouse to Hotlanta – starting May 12.

If you are planning on joining the OpenStack community in Atlanta why not drop by the Red Hat booth and say Hi, or catch us at one of the many sessions we will be presenting.

Repost: Red Hat’s Commitment to IceHouse OpenStack

by Maria Gallegos, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — April 24, 2014

The OpenStack Foundation unveiled its latest release – OpenStack IceHouse – on April 17, and while Bitergia is still crunching the numbers, once again, Red Hat was the top corporate contributor. While we’re certainly proud of our ongoing work in the OpenStack community, our role as a leading open source contributor is no secret. Community-powered innovation is at our core, and Red Hat’s commitment to OpenStack is no different.

Read the full post to learn more: http://www.redhat.com/about/news/archive/2014/4/red-hats-commitment-to-openstack-icehouse

 

The Road To High Availability for OpenStack

by Arthur Berezin — April 16, 2014

Why OpenStack High Availability is Important?
Many organizations choose OpenStack for it’s distributed architecture and ability to deliver Infrastructure-as-a-Service environment for scale-out applications to run on top of it, for private on premise clouds or public clouds. It is quite common for OpenStack to run mission critical applications. OpenStack itself is commonly deployed in Controller/Network-Node/Computes layout where the controller runs management services such as nova-scheduler that determines how to dispatch compute resources, and Keystone service that handles authentication and authorization for all services.

Although failure of the controller node would not cause disruption to already running application workloads on top of OpenStack, for organizations running production applications it is critical to provide 99.999% uptime of the control plane of their cloud, and deploy the controller in a highly available configuration so that OpenStack services are accessible at all times and applications can scale-out or scale-in according to workloads.

Read the full post »

An Icehouse Sneak Peek – OpenStack Networking (Neutron)

by Nir Yechiel

Today’s datacenter networks contain more devices than ever before; servers, switches, routers, storage systems, dedicated network equipment and security appliances – many of which are further divided into virtual machines and virtual networks. Traditional network management techniques generally fall short of providing a truly scalable, automated approach to managing these next-generation networks. Users expect more control and flexibility with quicker provisioning and monitoring.

OpenStack Networking (Neutron) is a pluggable, scalable and API-driven system for managing networks and IP addresses. Like other aspects of the cloud operating system, it can be used by administrators and users to increase the value of existing datacenter infrastructure. Neutron prevents the network from being the bottleneck or limiting factor in a cloud deployment and gives users real self service over their network configurations.
Starting in the Folsom release, OpenStack Networking, then called Quantum, became a core and supported part of the OpenStack platform, and is considered to be one of the most exicting projects – with great innovation around network virtualization and software-defined networking (SDN). The general availability of Icehouse, the ninth release of OpenStack, is just around the corner, so I would like to highlight some of the key features and enhancements made by the contributors in the community to Neutron.

Read the full post »

What’s New in Icehouse Storage

by Sean Cohen, Principal Technical Product Manager, Red Hat — April 15, 2014

The latest OpenStack 2014.1 release introduces many important new features across the OpenStack Storage services that includes an advanced block storage Quality of Service, a new API to support Disaster Recovery between OpenStack deployments, a new advanced Multi-Locations strategy for OpenStack Image service & many  improvements to authentication, replication and metadata in OpenStack Object storage.

Here is a Sneak Peek of the upcoming Icehouse release:

Block Storage (Cinder)
The Icehouse release includes a lot of quality and compatibility improvements such as improved block storage load distribution in Cinder Scheduler, replacing Simple/Chance Scheduler with FilterScheduler, advancing to the latest TaskFlow support in volume create, Cinder support for Quota delete was added, as well as support for automated FC SAN zone/access control management in Cinder for Fibre Channel volumes to reduce pre-zoning complexity in cloud orchestration and prevent unrestricted fabric access.

Read the full post »

Repost: KVM Virtualization – Refining the Virtual World with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta

by Maria Gallegos, Principal Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat — April 10, 2014

Originally posted on January 29, 2014 by Bhavna Sarathy

Are the virtualization enhancements to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 beta relevant to your own day-to-day operations?

Read the full blog post where Bhavna Sarathy gives a deep dive and learn what’s new in the beta release and how the enhancements relate to your business.

http://rhelblog.redhat.com/2014/01/29/kvm-virtualization/

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