Session Voting Now Open, for OpenStack Summit Paris!

The voting polls for speaking sessions at this Fall’s OpenStack Summit in Paris, France are now open to the public. This time around it seems Red Hatters are looking to participate in more sessions then any previous Summit, helping to share innovation happening at Red Hat and in the greater community.

With an incredible quantity of sessions submitted this Summit, we’ve got quite a diverse selection for you to vote on. Spanning from low-level core compute, networking, and storage sessions, to plenty of customer success stories and lessons learned.


Each and every vote counts, so please have a look through the Red Hat submitted sessions below and vote for your favorites! If you’re new to the voting process, you must sign up for a free OpenStack Foundation member username and cast your votes. Visit the foundation site here, to sign up for free!

Once you’ve signed up as a member, click on the titles below to cast your vote. Remember, voting closes on Wednesday August 6th.

Have a look at our sessions here and cast your vote! I’ve sorted by category:

Storage

  1. OpenStack Storage APIs and Ceph: Existing Architectures and Future Features
  2. Deployment Best Practices for OpenStack Software-Defined Storage with Ceph
  3. What’s New in Ceph?
  4. OpenStack and Ceph – Match Made in the Cloud
  5. Large Scale OpenStack Block Storage with Containerized Ceph
  6. Red Hat Training: Using Ceph and Red Hat Storage Server in Cinder
  7. Volume Retyping and Cinder Backend Configuring
  8. Using OpenStack Swift for Extreme Data Durability
  9. Ask the Experts: Challenges for OpenStack Storage
  10. Deploying Red Hat Block and Object Storage with Mellanox and Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform
  11. Vanquish Performance Bottlenecks and Deliver Resilient, Agile Infrastructure, with All Flash Storage and OpenStack
  12. GlusterFS: The Scalable Open Source Backend for Manila
  13. Delivering Elastic Big Data Analytics with OpenStack Sahara and Distributed Storage
  14. Deploying Swift on a Scale-Out File System

Continue reading “Session Voting Now Open, for OpenStack Summit Paris!”

Juno Preview for OpenStack Compute (Nova)

Originally posted on blog.russellbryant.net.

We’re now well into the Juno release cycle. Here’s my take on a preview of some of what you can expect in Juno for Nova.

NFV

One area receiving a lot of focus this cycle is NFV. We’ve started an upstream NFV sub-team for OpenStack that is tracking and helping to drive requirements and development efforts in support of NFV use cases. If you’re not familiar with NFV, here’s a quick overview that was put together by the NFV sub-team:

NFV stands for Network Functions Virtualization. It defines the
replacement of usually stand alone appliances used for high and low
level network functions, such as firewalls, network address translation,
intrusion detection, caching, gateways, accelerators, etc, into virtual
instance or set of virtual instances, which are called Virtual Network
Functions (VNF). In other words, it could be seen as replacing some of
the hardware network appliances with high-performance software taking
advantage of high performance para-virtual devices, other acceleration
mechanisms, and smart placement of instances. The origin of NFV comes
from a working group from the European Telecommunications Standards
Institute (ETSI) whose work is the basis of most current
implementations. The main consumers of NFV are Service providers
(telecommunication providers and the like) who are looking to accelerate
the deployment of new network services, and to do that, need to
eliminate the constraint of slow renewal cycle of hardware appliances,
which do not autoscale and limit their innovation.

NFV support for OpenStack aims to provide the best possible
infrastructure for such workloads to be deployed in, while respecting
the design principles of a IaaS cloud. In order for VNF to perform
correctly in a cloud world, the underlying infrastructure needs to
provide a certain number of functionalities which range from scheduling
to networking and from orchestration to monitoring capacities. This
means that to correctly support NFV use cases in OpenStack,
implementations may be required across most, if not all, main OpenStack
projects, starting with Neutron and Nova.

Continue reading “Juno Preview for OpenStack Compute (Nova)”