OpenStack Summit Paris: Agenda Confirms 22 Red Hat Sessions

As this Fall’s OpenStack Summit in Paris approaches, the Foundation has posted the session agenda, outlining the schedule of events. With an astonishing 1,100+ sessions submitted for review, I was happy to see that Red Hat and eNovance have a combined 22 sessions that are included in the weeks agenda, with two more as alternates.

As I’ve mentioned in the past, I really respect the way the Foundation goes about setting the agenda – essentially deferring to the attendees and participants themselves, via a vote. Through this voting process, the subjects that are “top-of-mind” and of most interest in learning more about are brought to the surface, resulting in a very current and cutting edge set of discussions. And with so many accepted sessions, it again confirms that Red Hat, and now eNovance, are involved in some of the most current projects and technologies that the community is most interested in.

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Free webinar on the Heat orchestration service

On Tuesday, September 30, we will presenting a Taste of Red Hat Training webinar dedicated to Heat, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform orchestration service that allows you to run multiple composite cloud applications. There will be two live sessions of the webinar run that day, at 9 am EST and 2 pm EST to accommodate the usual international audience.

Join Red Hat curriculum developer, Adolfo Vazquez, as he teaches you about the basics of the Heat orchestration service in Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, the Heat core services, and how to configure applications on the OpenStack infrastructure. Content for the webinar is pulled directly from our popular Red Hat OpenStack Administration (CL210) course.

Click here for more information and to register.

Announcing Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta

Today, we are excited to announce the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta to existing Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization customers. The Beta release allows our customers to easily manage and automate many virtualization tasks while providing an on-ramp to accommodate cloud enabled workloads based on OpenStack. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta provides new features across compute, storage, network, and infrastructure.

One key feature to highlight is the full integration with OpenStack Glance and Neutron services. This feature was previously in tech preview. The strong integration between Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization and OpenStack enables customers to eliminate silos and scale up to meet business demands.

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 Beta is available to all existing customers with active Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization subscriptions today. Please view the 3.5 Beta Installation Guide here for details on how to start testing the beta release.

Please note that RHEV 3.5 Beta 1 will not support the use of the RHEV-H Hypervisor and will only support the use of a RHEL Hypervisor Host.  We apologize for this delay, and plan on the RHEV-H Hypervisor to be available in the RHEV 3.5 Beta 2 refresh.

Also note that there was a last second issue identified with the dwh component that prevents its installation in RHEV 3.5 Beta 1.  This will be resolved in the RHEV 3.5 Beta 2 refresh.

What’s Coming in OpenStack Networking for Juno Release

Neutron, historically known as Quantum, is the OpenStack project focused on delivering networking as a service. As the Juno development cycle ramps up, now is a good time to review some of the key changes we saw in Neutron during this exciting cycle and have a look at what is coming up in the next upstream major release which is set to debut in October.

Neutron or Nova Network?

The original OpenStack Compute network implementation, also known as Nova Network, assumed a basic model of performing all isolation through Linux VLANs and iptables. These are typically sufficient for small and simple networks, but larger customers are likely to have more sophisticated network requirements. Neutron introduces the concept of a plug-in, which is a back-end implementation of the OpenStack Networking API. A plug-in can use a variety of technologies to implement the logical API requests and offer a rich set of network topologies, including network overlays with protocols like GRE or VXLAN, and network services such as load balancing, virtual private networks or firewalls that plug into OpenStack tenant networks. Neutron also enables third parties to write plug-ins that introduce advanced network capabilities, such as the ability to leverage capabilities from the physical data center network fabric, or use software-defined networking (SDN) approaches with protocols like OpenFlow. One of the main Juno efforts is a plan to enable easier Nova Network to Neutron migration for users that would like to upgrade their networking model for the OpenStack cloud.

Performance Enhancements and Stability

The OpenStack Networking community is actively working on several enhancements to make Neutron a more stable and mature codebase. Among the different enhancements, recent changes to the security-group implementation should result in significant improvement and better scalability of this popular feature. To recall, security groups allows administrators and tenants the ability to specify the type of traffic and direction (ingress/egress) that is allowed to pass through a Neutron port, effectively creating an instance-level firewall filter. You can read this great post by Miguel Angel Ajo, a Red Hat employee who led this effort in the Neutron community, to learn more about the changes.

In addition, there are continuous efforts to improve the upstream testing framework, and to create a better separation between unit tests and functional tests, as well as better testing strategy and coverage for API changes.

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OpenStack Resources for the vAdmin

Across many enterprise organizations, IT is driving innovation that allows companies to be more agile and gain a competitive edge. These are exciting times for the Vadmins who are at the center of this change. This innovation starts with bridging the gap between traditional virtualization workloads and cloud-enabled workloads based on OpenStack.

Organizations are embracing OpenStack because it allows them to more rapidly scale to meet evolving user demands without sacrificing performance on a stable and flexible platform and at a cost effective level.

As a Vadmin, you might be asking yourself how OpenStack fits in your world of traditional virtualization workloads. The answer is that OpenStack is not a replacement rather it is an extension to traditional virtualization platforms.

To help vAdmins get started with OpenStack, we have created a dedicated page with numerous OpenStack resources including a solutions guide that explains the architectural differences between OpenStack and VMware vSphere, as well as an appliance that allows you to quickly run and deploy OpenStack in your VMware vSphere environment.

Visit this OpenStack Resources vAdmin page to learn how to get started with OpenStack in your existing infrastructure today.