How Red Hat’s OpenStack partner Networking Solutions Offer Choice and Performance

Successfully implementing an OpenStack cloud is more than just choosing an OpenStack distribution. With its community approach and rich ecosystem of vendors, OpenStack represents a viable option for cloud administrators who want to offer public-cloud-like infrastructure services in their own datacenter.  Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform offers pluggable storage and networking options.  This open approach is contrary to closed solutions such as VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) which only supports VMware NSX for L4-L7  networking or VMware Distributed switch for basic L2 networking .

Below are some of the networking partners who have certified their OpenStack Networking plugins with Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform and will be on display at VMworld 2015, San Francisco, at the Red Hat booth, 528; (Cisco is at booth 1721). See exhibitor map

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Performance and Scaling your Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform Cloud

As OpenStack continues to grow into a mainstream Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) platform, the industry seeks to learn more about its performance and scalability for use in production environments. As recently captured in this blog, common questions that typically arise are: “Is my hardware vendor working with my software vendor?”, “How much hardware would I actually need?”, and “What are the best practices for scaling out my OpenStack environment?”  

These common questions are often difficult to answer because they rely on environment specifics. With every environment being different, often composed of products from multiple vendors, how does one go about finding answers to these generic questions?

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Upgrades are dying, don’t die with them

We live in a world that has changed the way it consumes applications. The last few years have seen a rapid rise in the adoption of Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS). Much of this can be attributed to the broad success of Amazon Web Services (AWS), which is said to have grown revenue from $3.1B to $5B last year (Forbes). More and more people, enterprise customers included, are consuming applications and resources that require little to no maintenance. And any maintenance that does happen, now goes unnoticed by users. This leaves traditional software vendors contending to find a way to adapt their distribution models to make their software easier to consume. Lengthy, painful upgrades are no longer acceptable to users, forcing vendors to create a solution to this problem.

Let’s face it, the impact of this on traditional software companies are starting to be felt. Their services and methods of doing business are now being compared to a newer, more efficient model. One that is not bogged down by the inefficiencies of the traditional model. SaaS has the advantage that the software runs in their datacenters, where they have easy access to it, control the hardware, the architecture, the configurations, and so on.

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How to choose the best-fit hardware for your OpenStack deployment

One of the benefits of OpenStack is the ability to deploy the software on standard x86 hardware, and thus not be locked-in to custom architectures and high prices from specialized vendors.

Before you select your x86 hardware, you might want to consider how you will resolve hardware/software related issues:

  • Is my distribution of OpenStack and the underlying Linux, certified to run on the hardware I use?
  • Will the vendor of my OpenStack distribution work with my hardware vendor to resolve issues?

There was a panel session  (Cisco, Ooyala, Sprint, and Shutterfly) on OpenStack use cases at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, May 2015. At the end, an audience member asked “How important is it that the OpenStack distribution is  certified to run on the hardware you use?

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