What’s new in OpenStack Liberty: webinar recap

OpenStack “Liberty,” due for imminent release, represents the 12th release of the open source computing platform for public and private clouds. Recent OpenStack releases have focused on improving stability and enhancing the operator experience. This is still the case with Liberty, but there are still new features to consider.

On October 1st we provided a sneak peek into the highlights of OpenStack Liberty, if you missed out you can now view the recording of the event on demand. As well as providing an overview the highlights of the Liberty release we also discussed the recent restructure of the way governance of OpenStack projects works, colloquially referred to as the “big tent”, and what it means for you as a consumer of OpenStack.

Continue reading “What’s new in OpenStack Liberty: webinar recap”

Highly available virtual machines in RHEL OpenStack Platform 7

OpenStack provides scale and redundancy at the infrastructure layer to provide high availability for applications built for operation in a horizontally scaling cloud computing environment. It has been designed for applications that are “designed for failure” and voluntarily excluded features that would enable traditional enterprise applications, in fear of limiting its’ scalability and corrupting its initial goals. These traditional enterprise applications demand continuous operation, and fast, automatic recovery in the event of an infrastructure level failure. While an increasing number of enterprises look to OpenStack as providing the infrastructure platform for their forward-looking applications they are also looking  to simplify operations by consolidating their legacy application workloads on it as well.

As part of the On-Ramp to Enterprise OpenStack program, Red Hat, in collaboration with Intel, Cisco and Dell, have been working on delivering a high availability solution for such enterprise workloads running on top of OpenStack. This work provides an initial implementation of the instance high availability proposal that we put forward in the past and is included in the recently released Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 7.

Continue reading “Highly available virtual machines in RHEL OpenStack Platform 7”

Driving in the Fast Lane: Huge Page support in OpenStack Compute

In a previous “Driving in the Fast Lane” blog post we focused on optimization of instance CPU resources. This time around let’s take a dive into the handling of system memory, and more specifically configurable page sizes. We will reuse the environment from the previous post, but add huge page support to our performance flavor.

What are Pages?

Physical memory is segmented into a series of contiguous regions called pages. For efficiency instead of accessing individual bytes of memory one by one the system retrieves memory by accessing entire pages. Each page contains a number of bytes, referred to as the page size. To do this though the system must first translate virtual addresses into physical addresses to determine which page contains the requested memory.

Continue reading “Driving in the Fast Lane: Huge Page support in OpenStack Compute”

Voting Open for OpenStack Summit Tokyo Submissions: Container deployment, management, security and operations – oh my!

This week we have been providing a preview of Red Hat submissions for the upcoming OpenStack Summit to be held October 27-30, in Tokyo, Japan. Today’s grab bag of submissions focus on containers the relationship between them and OpenStack as well as how to deploy, manage, secure, and operate workloads using them. This was already a hotbed of new ideas and discussion at the last summit in Vancouver and we expect things will only continue to heat up in this area as a result of recent announcements in the lead up to Tokyo!

The OpenStack Foundation manages allows its members to vote the topics and presentations they would like to see as part of the selection process. To vote for one of the listed sessions, click on the session title below and you will be directed to the voting page. If you are a member of the OpenStack Foundation, just login. If you are not, you are welcome to join now – it is simple and free.

Please make sure to vote before the deadline on Thursday, July 30 2015, at 11:59pm PDT.

Application & infrastructure continuous delivery using OpenShift and OpenStack
  • Mike McGrath – Senior Principal Architect, Atomic @ Red Hat
Atomic Enterprise on OpenStack
  • Jonathon Jozwiak – Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
Containers versus Virtualization: The New Cold War?
  • Jeremy Eder – Principal Performance Engineer @ Red Hat
Container security: Do containers actually contain? Should you care?
  • Dan Walsh – Senior Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
Container Security at Scale
  • Scott McCarty – Product Manager, Container Strategy @ Red Hat
Containers, Kubernetes, and GlusterFS, a match made in Tengoku
  • Luis Pabón – Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
  • Stephen Watt – Chief Architect, Big Data @ Red Hat
  • Jeff Vance – Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
Converged Storage in hybrid VM and Container deployments using Docker, Kubernetes, Atomic and OpenShift
  • Stephen Watt – Chief Architect, Big Data @ Red Hat
Deploying and Managing OpenShift on OpenStack with Ansible and Heat
  • Diane Mueller – Director Community Development, OpenShift @ Red Hat
  • Greg DeKoenigsberg –  Vice President, Community @ Ansible
  • Veer Michandi – Senior Solution Architect @ Red Hat
  • Ken Thompson – Senior Cloud Solution Architect @ Red Hat
  • Tomas Sedovic – Senior Software Engineer @ Red Hat
Deploying containerized applications across the Open Hybrid Cloud using Docker and the Nulecule spec
  • Tushar Katarki – Integration Architect @ Red Hat
  • Aaron Weitekamp – Senior Software Engineer @ Red Hat
Deploying Docker and Kubernetes with Heat and Atomic
  • Steve Gordon – Senior Technical Product Manager, OpenStack @ Red Hat
Develop, Deploy, and Manage Applications at Scale on an OpenStack based private cloud
  • James Labocki – Product Owner, CloudForms @ Red Hat
  • Brett Thurber – Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
  • Scott Collier – Senior Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
How to Train Your Admin
  • Aleksandr Brezhnev – Senior Principal Solution Architect @ Red Hat
  • Patrick Rutledge – Principal Solution Architect @ Red Hat
Minimizing or eliminating service outages via robust application life-cycle management with container technologies
  • Tushar Katarki – Integration Architect @ Red Hat
  • Aaron Weitekamp – Senior Software Engineer @ Red Hat
OpenStack and Containers Advanced Management
  • Federico Simoncelli – Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
OpenStack & The Future of the Containerized OS
  • Daniel Riek – Senior Director, Systems Design & Engineering @ Red Hat
Operating Enterprise Applications in Docker Containers with Kubernetes and Atomic Enterprise
  • Mike McGrath – Senior Principal Architect, Atomic @ Red Hat
Present & Future-proofing your datacenter with SDS & OpenStack Manila
  • Luis Pabón – Principal Software Engineer @ Red Hat
  • Sean Murphy – Product Manager, Red Hat Storage @ Red Hat
  • Sean Cohen – Principal Product Manager, OpenStack @ Red Hat
Scale or Fail – Scaling applications with Docker, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and OpenStack
  • Grant Shipley – Senior Manager @ Red Hat
  • Diane Mueller – Director Community Development, OpenShift @ Red Hat

Thanks for taking the time to help shape the next OpenStack summit!

Voting Open for OpenStack Summit Tokyo Submissions: OpenStack for the Enterprise

In the lead up to OpenStack Summit Hong Kong, the last OpenStack Summit held in the Asia-Pacific region, Radhesh Balakrishnan – General Manager for OpenStack at Red Hat – defined this site as the place to follow us on our journey taking community projects to enterprise products and solutions.

We are excited to now be preparing to head back to the Asia-Pacific region for OpenStack Summit Tokyo – October 27-30 – to share just how far we have come on that journey with host of session proposals focussing on enterprise requirements and the success of OpenStack in this space. The OpenStack Foundation manages voting by allowing its members to choose the topics and presentations they would like to see.

To vote, click on the session title below and you will be directed to the voting page. If you are a member of the OpenStack Foundation, just login. If you are not, you are welcome to join now – it is simple and free.

Vote for your favorites by midnight Pacific Standard Time on July 30th and we will see you in Tokyo!

Is OpenStack ready for the enterprise? Is the enterprise ready for OpenStack?

Can I use OpenStack to build an enterprise cloud?
  • Alessandro Perilli – General Manager, Cloud Management Strategies @ Red Hat
Elephant in the Room: What’s the TCO for an OpenStack cloud?
  • Massimo Ferrari – Director, Cloud Management Strategy @ Red Hat
  • Erich Morisse – Director, Cloud Management Strategy @ Red Hat
The Journey to Enterprise Primetime
  • Arkady Kanevsky – Director of Development @ Dell
  • Das Kamhout – Principal Engineer @ Intel
  • Fabio Di Nitto – Manager, Software Engineering @ Red Hat
  • Nick Barcet – Director of OpenStack Product Management @ Red Hat
Organizing IT to Deliver OpenStack
  • Brent Holden – Chief Cloud Architect @ Red Hat
  • Michael Solberg – Chief Field Architect @ Red Hat
How Customers use OpenStack to deliver Business Applications
  • Matthias Pfützner – Cloud Solution Architect @ Red Hat
Stop thinking traditional infrastructure – Think Cloud! A recipe to build a successful cloud environment
  • Laurent Domb – Cloud Solution Architect @ Red Hat
  • Narendra Narang – Cloud Storage Solution Architect @ Red Hat
Breaking the OpenStack Dream – OpenStack deployments with business goals in mind
  • Laurent Domb – Cloud Solution Architect @ Red Hat
  • Narendra Narang – Cloud Storage Solution Architect @ Red Hat

Enterprise Success Stories

OpenStack for robust and reliable enterprise private cloud: An analysis of current capabilities, gaps, and how they can be addressed.
  • Tushar Katarki – Integration Architect @ Red Hat
  • Rama Nishtala – Architect @ Cisco
  • Nick Gerasimatos – Senior Director of Cloud Services – Engineering @ FICO
  • Das Kamhout – Principal Engineer @ Intel
Verizon’s NFV Learnings
  • Bowen Ross – Global Account Manager @ Red Hat
  • David Harris – Manager, Network Element Evolution Planning @ Verizon
Cloud automation with Red Hat CloudForms: Migrating 1000+ servers from VMWare to OpenStack
  • Lan Chen – Senior Consultant @ Red Hat
  • Bill Helgeson – Principal Domain Architect @ Red Hat
  • Shawn Lower – Enterprise Architect @ Red Hat

Solutions for the Enterprise

RHCI: A comprehensive Solution for Private IaaS Clouds
  • Todd Sanders – Director of Engineering @ Red Hat
  • Jason Rist – Senior Software Engineer @ Red Hat
  • John Matthews – Senior Software Engineer @ Red Hat
  • Tzu-Mainn Chen – Senior Software Engineer @ Red Hat
Cisco UCS Integrated Infrastructure for Red Hat OpenStack
  • Guil Barros – Principal Product Manager, OpenStack @ Red Hat
  • Vish Jakka – Product Manager, UCS Solutions @ Cisco
Cisco UCS & Red Hat OpenStack: Upstream Partnership to Streamline OpenStack
  • Guil Barros – Principal Product Manager, OpenStack @ Red Hat
  • Vish Jakka – Product Manager, UCS Solutions @ Cisco
  • Arek Chylinski – Technologist @ Intel
Deploying and Integrating OpenShift on Dell’s OpenStack Cloud Reference Architecture
  • Judd Maltin – Systems Principal Engineer @ Dell
  • Diane Mueller – Director Community Development, OpenShift @ Red Hat
Scalable and Successful OpenStack Deployments on FlexPod
  • Muhammad Afzal – Architect, Engineering @ Cisco
  • Dave Cain Reference Architect and Technical Marketing Engineer @ NetApp
Simplifying Openstack in the Enterprise with Cisco and Red Hat
  • Karthik Prabhakar – Global Cloud Technologist @ Red Hat
  • Duane DeCapite – Director of Product Management, OpenStack @ Cisco
It’s a team sport: building a hardened enterprise ecosystem
  • Hugo Rivero – Senior Manager, Ecosystem Technology Certification @ Red Hat
Dude, this isn’t where I parked my instance!?
  • Steve Gordon – Senior Technical Product Manager, OpenStack @ Red Hat
Libguestfs: the ultimate disk-image multi-tool
  • Luigi Toscano – Senior Quality Engineer @ Red Hat
  • Pino Toscano – Software Engineer @ Red Hat
Which Third party OpenStack Solutions should I use in my Cloud?
  • Rohan Kande – Senior Software Engineer @ Red Hat
  • Anshul Behl – Associate Quality Engineer @ Red Hat

Securing OpenStack for the Enterprise

Everything You Need to Know to Secure an OpenStack Cloud (but Were Afraid to Ask)
  • Jonathan Gershater – Senior Principal Product Marketing Manager @ Red Hat
  • Ted Brunell – Senior Solution Architect @ Red Hat
Towards a more Secure OpenStack Cloud
  • Paul Lancaster – Strategic Partner Development Manager @ Red Hat
  • Malini Bhandaru – Architect & Engineering Manager @ Intel
  • Dan Yocum – Senior Operations Manager, Red Hat
Hands-on lab: configuring Keystone to trust your favorite OpenID Connect Provider.
  • Pedro Navarro Perez – Openstack Specialized Solution Architect @ Red Hat
  • Francesco Vollero – Openstack Specialized Solution Architect @ Red Hat
  • Pablo Sanchez – Openstack Specialized Solution Architect @ Red Hat
Securing OpenStack with Identity Management in Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • Nathan Kinder – Software Engineering Manager @ Red Hat
Securing your Application Stacks on OpenStack
  • Jonathan Gershater – Senior Principal Product Marketing Manager @ Red Hat
  • Diane Mueller – Director, Community Development for OpenShift @ Red Hat

Celebrating Kubernetes 1.0 and the future of container management on OpenStack

This week, together with Google and others we celebrated the launch of Kubernetes 1.0 at OSCON in Portland as well as the launch of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation or CNCF (https://cncf.io/), of which Red Hat, Google, and others are founding members. Kubernetes is an open source system for managing containerized applications providing basic mechanisms for deployment, maintenance, and scaling of applications. The project was originally created by Google and is now developed by a vibrant community of contributors including Red Hat.

As a leading contributor to both Kubernetes and OpenStack it was also recently our great pleasure to welcome Google to the OpenStack Foundation. We look forward to continuing to work with Google and others on combining the container orchestration and management capabilities of Kubernetes with the infrastructure management capabilities of OpenStack.

Red Hat has invested heavily in Kubernetes since joining the project shortly after it was launched in June 2014, and are now the largest corporate contributor of code to the project other than Google itself. The recently announced release of Red Hat’s platform-as-a-service offering, OpenShift v3, is built around Kubernetes as the framework for container orchestration and management.

As a founding member of the OpenStack Foundation we have been working on simplifying the task of deploying and managing container hosts – using Project Atomic –  and configuring a Kubernetes cluster on top of OpenStack infrastructure using the Heat orchestration engine.

To that end Red Hat engineering created the heat-kubernetes orchestration templates to help accelerate research and development into providing deeper integration between Kubernetes and the underlying OpenStack infrastructure. The templates continue to evolve to include coverage for other aspects of container workload management such as auto-scaling and were recently demonstrated at Red Hat summit:

The heat-kubernetes templates were also ultimately leveraged in bootstrapping the OpenStack Magnum project which provides an OpenStack API for provisioning container clusters using underlying orchestration technologies including Kubernetes. The aim of this is to make containers first class citizens within OpenStack just like virtual machines and bare-metal before them, with the ability to share tenant infrastructure resources (e.g. networking and storage) with other OpenStack-managed virtual machines, baremetal hosts, and the containers running on them. Providing this level of integration requires providing or expanding OpenStack implementations of existing Kubernetes plug-in points as well as defining new plug-in APIs where necessary while maintaining the technical independence of the solution. All this must be done while allowing application workloads to remain independent of the underlying infrastructure and allowing for true open hybrid cloud operation. Similarly on the OpenStack side additional work is required so that the infrastructure services are able to support the use cases presented by container-based workloads and remove redundancies between the application workloads and the underlying hardware to optimize performance while still providing for secure operation.

Containers on OpenStack Architecture

Magnum, and the OpenStack Containers Team, provide a focal point to coordinate these research and development efforts across multiple upstream projects as well as other projects within the OpenStack ecosystem itself to achieve the goal of providing a rich container-based experience on OpenStack infrastructure.

As a leading contributor to both OpenStack and Kubernetes we at Red Hat look forward to continuing to work on increased integration with both the OpenStack and Kubernetes communities and our technology partners at Google as these exciting technologies for managing the “data-centers of the future” converge.

Driving in the Fast Lane – CPU Pinning and NUMA Topology Awareness in OpenStack Compute

The OpenStack Kilo release, extending upon efforts that commenced during the Juno cycle, includes a number of key enhancements aimed at improving guest performance. These enhancements allow OpenStack Compute (Nova) to have greater knowledge of compute host layout and as a result make smarter scheduling and placement decisions when launching instances. Administrators wishing to take advantage of these features can now create customized performance flavors to target specialized workloads including Network Function Virtualization (NFV) and High Performance Computing (HPC).

What is NUMA topology?

Historically, all memory on x86 systems was equally accessible to all CPUs in the system. This resulted in memory access times that were the same regardless of which CPU in the system was performing the operation and was referred to as Uniform Memory Access (UMA).

In modern multi-socket x86 systems system memory is divided into zones (called cells or nodes) and associated with particular CPUs. This type of division has been key to the increasing performance of modern systems as focus has shifted from increasing clock speeds to adding more CPU sockets, cores, and – where available – threads. An interconnect bus provides connections between nodes, so that all CPUs can still access all memory. While the memory bandwidth of the interconnect is typically faster than that of an individual node it can still be overwhelmed by concurrent cross node traffic from many nodes. The end result is that while NUMA facilitates faster memory access for CPUs local to the memory being accessed, memory access for remote CPUs is slower.

Continue reading “Driving in the Fast Lane – CPU Pinning and NUMA Topology Awareness in OpenStack Compute”

A Closer Look at RHEL OpenStack Platform 6

Last week we announced the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 6, the latest version of our cloud solution providing a foundation for production-ready cloud. Built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 this latest release is intended to provide a foundation for building OpenStack-powered clouds for advanced cloud users. Lets take a deeper dive into some of the new features on offer!

IPv6 Networking Support

IPv6 is a critical part of the promise of the cloud. If you want to connect everything to the network, you better plan for massive scale and have enough addresses to use. IPv6 is also increasingly important in the network functions virtualization (NFV) and telecommunication service provider space.

This release introduces support for IPv6 address assignment for tenant instances including those that are connected to provider networks; while IPv4 is more straight forward when it comes to IP address assignment, IPv6 offers some more flexibility and options to choose from. Both stateful and stateless DHCPv6 are supported, as well as the ability to use Stateless Address Autoconfiguration (SLAAC).

Continue reading “A Closer Look at RHEL OpenStack Platform 6”

OpenStack Summit, Atlanta 2014: Year of the superuser?

The OpenStack community gathered recently in Atlanta to define the roadmap for the upcoming Juno release cycle and reflect on Icehouse. Icehouse is the release that forms the basis of the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5, a beta for which was announced during the week.

The biannual summit moved back to North America and again increased in size with some 4500 stackers in attendance, up from 3500 in Hong Kong only six months ago. The OpenStack Foundation again handled this with aplomb, organizing an excellent event in the spacious Georgia World Congress Center.

2014, year of the superuser?

The increased presence of OpenStack superusers at this summit was hard to miss with several keynote appearances including AT&T, Disney, Sony, and Wells Fargo as well as many other users leading or participating in general summit sessions. A convenient youtube playlist listing these user-led sessions has since been made available. The OpenStack Foundation also recently launched the superuser.openstack.org publication to coincide with this renewed push to bring users forward.

 

Continue reading “OpenStack Summit, Atlanta 2014: Year of the superuser?”

OpenStack Summit Breakout Sessions – Update

Previously, we announced the 20 sessions at OpenStack Summit Atlanta that feature Red Hat speakers. In addition to these 20 sessions throughout the week, Red Hat will also have a dedicated track for the full day on Monday May 12th from 11:15am to 6:10pm, in room B312. Here, you’ll be able to learn more about the specific efforts Red Hat is making around our commercially supported OpenStack products and joint partner solutions.

Below are the sessions we will be presenting in our breakout room, with Red Hat speakers as well as partners and customers. We encourage you to explore the agenda on the OpenStack schedule builder by going to http://openstacksummitmay2014atlanta.sched.org/?s=B312

Space is limited and schedules are filling up, so please sure to reserve your space soon!

Filling the Management Gap: Cloud Management Platforms for Managing OpenStack and Other Cloud Infrastructures
In this session, you will learn how cloud management platforms bring critical management capabilities like chargeback/showback, configuration and lifecycle management, orchestration, automation, and governance driven by IT-defined policies, and capacity and utilization reporting to your OpenStack deployment.

  • Monday 11:15-11:55am
  • Brad Ascar, Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat

Continue reading “OpenStack Summit Breakout Sessions – Update”

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