Repost: Why only Red Hat is “The Red Hat of OpenStack”

Originally posted on August 12, 2013, by Tim Burk, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 4 of a 4 part series [1]

Tim’s earlier posts include:

As described in my earlier posts, it is plain to see that Red Hat is not treating OpenStack as “just” a layered product.

Rather, Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform is the next major evolution in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux family. The tight levels of integration and responsible enterprise grade feature enhancement necessitate this combination. We believe that doing OpenStack right – to make it secure, performant, easy to use, and evolve over time – is only possible by taking a holistic approach.

Continue reading “Repost: Why only Red Hat is “The Red Hat of OpenStack””

Repost: Why combine Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenStack? Integration and Ecosystem Benefits.

Originally posted on August 5, 2013, by Tim Burke, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 3 of a 4 part series [1]

Part 3.

In my last post, I discussed a small subset of the security, storage, networking, virtualization, and performance optimizations that make the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform offering technically superior. Yet, as innovation continues in the vibrant upstream OpenStack and Linux communities, Red Hat’s integration work is ongoing. Our subscription model assures that customers will continue to have access to this ongoing stream of innovation –  innovation that is made possible through the tight coordination of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux development team, which now includes OpenStack components. The goals of that coordination include:

  • Component Integration – There are several parts of OpenStack that have dependencies on specific versions of run-times or system utilities. For example, there are specific networking modules required for software-defined networks (SDNs), specific versions of python run-times, custom Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) security policies, and even system tunings for virtualized guest environments. Piecing together the specific versions and making the completed whole function optimally can be a daunting challenge.

Continue reading “Repost: Why combine Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenStack? Integration and Ecosystem Benefits.”

Repost: Why combine Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenStack? Technology Optimization Benefits.

Originally posted on July 24, 2013, by Tim Burke, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 2 of a part 4 series [1]

Part 2.
OpenStack delivers a highly scalable cloud environment for a variety of applications. But, cloud workloads present new challenges for underlying operating system platforms. The nature of the cloud is to be agile, not static. Virtual machines are quickly created and destroyed in large numbers. Storage and networking need to be flexible and highly performant. Red Hat Enterprise Linux has evolved to match the pace and unique characteristics of cloud deployments and is optimized for OpenStack in several ways, including:

  • Security – Cloud environments don’t deploy applications on dedicated hardware. Rather, they deploy multiple virtual machines on top of a pool of generic hardware resources, with virtual machines often sharing the same hardware. In this deployment model, virtual machine isolation is a key security concern. Enter Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the fine-grained permission enforcement afforded by Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) at the file, network and user levels. In Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, SELinux enforces specific policies that are unique to the needs of OpenStack, such as enabling OpenStack to configure network namespaces which utilize Openstack’s network services. The benefit of SELinux is to prevent different virtual guests from accessing network ports and connections maliciously. In this way, the security inherent in Red Hat Enterprise Linux enhances the security of OpenStack cloud environment.

Continue reading “Repost: Why combine Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenStack? Technology Optimization Benefits.”

Repost: The evolution of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and the answer to “Who will be the Red Hat of OpenStack?”

Originally posted on July 18, 2013 by Tim Burke, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 1 of a 4 part series [1]

Part 1.
Throughout its history, Red Hat Enterprise Linux has been been transformative in the information technology infrastructure platform arena. It was founded on the principles of bringing stability and a longer lifecycle required by commercial IT organizations to the rapidly changing, community-developed Linux operating system. This unleashed a wave of commoditized computing as Red Hat Enterprise Linux displaced expensive proprietary UNIX offerings, delivering customers lower costs and freedom from vendor lock-in.

The next wave of Red Hat Enterprise Linux focused on being first in the industry to offer the highest levels of security built into the mainstream product rather than being an obscure offshoot. This focus on security – including collaboration with the U.S. government’s National Security Agency (NSA) on Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) – paved the way for security-conscious governments and businesses around the globe to adopt Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Continue reading “Repost: The evolution of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and the answer to “Who will be the Red Hat of OpenStack?””