An Icehouse Sneak Peek – OpenStack Compute (Nova)

It seems like it was only yesterday that the OpenStack community found itself gathering in Hong Kong to set the design goals for the Icehouse release. As we entered March development was still progressing at a fever pitch in the lead up to the feature freeze for the release but now the dust has started to settle and we are able to start getting a real feel for what OpenStack users and operators can look forward to in the Icehouse release.
Today I’ll be giving a sneak peak to just some of the changes made in one of the two projects that made up the original OpenStack release and today is still one of the largest – showing no signs of the innovation slowing downOpenStack Compute (Nova). OpenStack Compute is a cloud computing fabric controller, a central component of an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) system. It is responsible for managing the hypervisors on which virtual machine instances will ultimately run and managing the lifecycle of those virtual machine instances. This list is by no means exhaustive but highlights some key features and the rapid advances made by the contributors that make up the OpenStack community in a six month release cycle.

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Is OpenStack for You?

As product manager and OpenStack evangelist you may think that the standard response to the question “Is OpenStack for You” is unequivocally “Yes!”.

Well, that’s not necessarily the case here.

To help bring clarity to the question, we’ve developed a webinar that tackles the “when (and when not) to” use OpenStack. In the webinar, we point out the characteristics of applications likely to flourish when used with OpenStack. We also explore various approaches for getting started with OpenStack.

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OpenStack Summit Session Voting Closes Soon – Your Vote Counts!

With the voting polls open for the past week, the OpenStack Foundation is collecting votes for all sessions at this Spring’s OpenStack Summit in Atlanta. Red Hat is doing its part to contribute as many innovative and useful session to the agenda. With a variety of sessions submitted, from low-level discussions on network routing and storage, all the way through real-world success stories that share experiences and lessons learned with deploying an OpenStack cloud, we’ve got a great lineup to offer you.

Each and every vote counts, so if you haven’t already voted, have a look through all the Red Hat submitted sessions and vote for your favorites! Just click on the title to cast your vote. Remember, voting closes on Monday, March 3rd.

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Repost: Deployment to Upgrade–Puppet OpenStack Modules Are Your Friends

Since the announcement of RDO and Red Hat OpenStack at the Spring 2013 OpenStack Summit, these have arguably become two of the most popular ways to install OpenStack. Both use the puppet-openstack modules to install OpenStack, and are just a sampling of the OpenStack installers that are based on Puppet.

Read the full post here: http://developerblog.redhat.com/2014/01/28/deploy-to-upgrade-puppet-openstack-modules/

Originally posted January 28, 2014, by Christian Hoge.

Repost: Why only Red Hat is “The Red Hat of OpenStack”

Originally posted on August 12, 2013, by Tim Burk, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 4 of a 4 part series [1]

Tim’s earlier posts include:

As described in my earlier posts, it is plain to see that Red Hat is not treating OpenStack as “just” a layered product.

Rather, Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform is the next major evolution in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux family. The tight levels of integration and responsible enterprise grade feature enhancement necessitate this combination. We believe that doing OpenStack right – to make it secure, performant, easy to use, and evolve over time – is only possible by taking a holistic approach.

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Repost: Why combine Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenStack? Integration and Ecosystem Benefits.

Originally posted on August 5, 2013, by Tim Burke, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 3 of a 4 part series [1]

Part 3.

In my last post, I discussed a small subset of the security, storage, networking, virtualization, and performance optimizations that make the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform offering technically superior. Yet, as innovation continues in the vibrant upstream OpenStack and Linux communities, Red Hat’s integration work is ongoing. Our subscription model assures that customers will continue to have access to this ongoing stream of innovation –  innovation that is made possible through the tight coordination of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux development team, which now includes OpenStack components. The goals of that coordination include:

  • Component Integration – There are several parts of OpenStack that have dependencies on specific versions of run-times or system utilities. For example, there are specific networking modules required for software-defined networks (SDNs), specific versions of python run-times, custom Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) security policies, and even system tunings for virtualized guest environments. Piecing together the specific versions and making the completed whole function optimally can be a daunting challenge.

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Repost: Why combine Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenStack? Technology Optimization Benefits.

Originally posted on July 24, 2013, by Tim Burke, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 2 of a part 4 series [1]

Part 2.
OpenStack delivers a highly scalable cloud environment for a variety of applications. But, cloud workloads present new challenges for underlying operating system platforms. The nature of the cloud is to be agile, not static. Virtual machines are quickly created and destroyed in large numbers. Storage and networking need to be flexible and highly performant. Red Hat Enterprise Linux has evolved to match the pace and unique characteristics of cloud deployments and is optimized for OpenStack in several ways, including:

  • Security – Cloud environments don’t deploy applications on dedicated hardware. Rather, they deploy multiple virtual machines on top of a pool of generic hardware resources, with virtual machines often sharing the same hardware. In this deployment model, virtual machine isolation is a key security concern. Enter Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the fine-grained permission enforcement afforded by Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) at the file, network and user levels. In Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, SELinux enforces specific policies that are unique to the needs of OpenStack, such as enabling OpenStack to configure network namespaces which utilize Openstack’s network services. The benefit of SELinux is to prevent different virtual guests from accessing network ports and connections maliciously. In this way, the security inherent in Red Hat Enterprise Linux enhances the security of OpenStack cloud environment.

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Repost: The evolution of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and the answer to “Who will be the Red Hat of OpenStack?”

Originally posted on July 18, 2013 by Tim Burke, vice president, Cloud and Virtualization Development, Red Hat – Part 1 of a 4 part series [1]

Part 1.
Throughout its history, Red Hat Enterprise Linux has been been transformative in the information technology infrastructure platform arena. It was founded on the principles of bringing stability and a longer lifecycle required by commercial IT organizations to the rapidly changing, community-developed Linux operating system. This unleashed a wave of commoditized computing as Red Hat Enterprise Linux displaced expensive proprietary UNIX offerings, delivering customers lower costs and freedom from vendor lock-in.

The next wave of Red Hat Enterprise Linux focused on being first in the industry to offer the highest levels of security built into the mainstream product rather than being an obscure offshoot. This focus on security – including collaboration with the U.S. government’s National Security Agency (NSA) on Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) – paved the way for security-conscious governments and businesses around the globe to adopt Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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