Red Hat confirms over 35 sessions at OpenStack Summit, Austin – Have a look!

As this Spring’s 2016 OpenStack Summit in Austin, TX nears, the Foundation has posted the final session agenda, outlining the week’s schedule of events. I am pleased to see that based on your voting, Red Hat continues to remain in sync with the current topics, projects, and technologies the OpenStack community and customers are most interested in. With the expectation of the largest attendee crowd yet, and some exciting advancements around containers, storage, networking, compute, and more, we look forward to sharing the 35+ generally accepted sessions, workshops, and BoFs that will be included in the weeks agenda.

Red Hat is a Headline sponsor in Austin this Spring and along with the general sessions, workshops, and breakout track, Chris Wright, VP of Software Engineering, will be giving a keynote presentation and update on our OpenStack technologies on Monday April 25th during the main keynote session segment, between 9:00-10:45am. If you’re planning to attend Jonathan’s main keynote on Monday, you’ll be able to catch Chris’s keynote as well. To learn more about Red Hat’s accepted sessions, have a look at the details below. Be sure to visit us at the below sessions, at our booth in the Marketplace, which starts on Monday evening during the booth crawl, 6-7:30pm, or come by and see us for some beer and sausage on Tuesday evening for the evening party event on Rainey St. Either way, we look forward to seeing you in Austin, Texas this April!

For more details on each session, click on the title below:

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Boosting the NFV datapath with RHEL OpenStack Platform

With software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) gaining traction, more cloud service providers are looking for open solutions, based on standardized hardware platforms and open source software. In particular, communication service providers (CSPs) are undergoing a major shift from specialized hardware-based network elements to a software based provisioning paradigm where virtualized network functions (VNFs) are deployed in private or hybrid clouds of network operators. Increasingly, OpenStack is seen as the virtual infrastructure platform of choice for NFV, with many of the world’s largest communications companies implementing solutions with OpenStack today.

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Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure Cited as a Leader Among Private Cloud Software Suites by Independent Research Firm

Earlier this week, Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure (RHCI) was named a leader in The Forrester Wave™: Private Cloud Software Suites, Q1 2016 report.

The Forrester report states that Red Hat “leads the evaluation with its powerful portal, top governance capabilities, and a strategy built around integration, open source, and interoperability. Rather than trying to build a custom approach for completing functions around operations, governance, or automation, Red Hat provides a very composable package by leveraging a mix of market standards and open source in addition to its own development.”

Moreover: “Red Hat received top marks for workflow life-cycle automation, administrative portal usability and experience, permissions, compliance tracking, capacity monitoring, platform APIs, ITSM and developer tools, and configuration management tool integration.”

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Ceilometer Polling Performance Improvement

During the OpenStack summit of May 2015 in Vancouver, the OpenStack Telemetry community team ran a session for operators to provide feedback. One of the main issues operators relayed was the polling that Ceilometer was running on Nova to gather instance information. It had a highly negative impact on the Nova API CPU usage, as it retrieves all the information about instances on regular intervals.

Indeed, it turns out that Nova is not optimizing the retrieval of these bits of information (a few rows in a database), and does not utilize a cache. Fortunately, Nova does provide a way to poll more efficiently with the Changes-Since request parameter.

As a result of this discovery, the Telemetry team built a blueprint named “resource-metadata-caching”, targeting the implementation of a local in-memory cache in Ceilometer, and the use of the Changes-Since parameter. This blueprint has been completed by Jason Myers during the Liberty development cycle and is therefore part of the final version of Ceilometer released for the Liberty cycle.

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Integrating classic IT with cloud-native

This is the fifth and final in a series of posts that delves deeper into the questions that IDC’s Mary Johnston Turner and Gary Chen considered in a recent IDC Analyst Connection. The fifth question asked:

What types of technologies are available to facilitate the integration of multiple generations of infrastructure and applications as hybrid cloud-native and conventional architectures evolve?

Mary and Gary write that “We expect that as these next-generation environments evolve, conventional and cloud-native infrastructure and development platforms will extend support for each other. As an example, OpenStack was built as a next-generation cloud-native solution, but it is now adding support for some enterprise features.”

This is the one aspect of integration. Today, it’s useful to draw a distinction between conventional and cloud-native infrastructures in part because they often use different technologies and those technologies are changing at different rates. However, as projects/products that are important for many enterprise cloud-native deployments–such as OpenStack–mature, they’re starting to adopt features associated with enterprise virtualization and enterprise management.

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Why cloud-native depends on modernization

This is the fourth in a series of posts that delves deeper into the questions that IDC’s Mary Johnston Turner and Gary Chen considered in a recent IDC Analyst Connection. The fourth question asked:

question asked:

What about existing conventional applications and infrastructure? Is it worth the time and effort to continue to modernize and upgrade conventional systems?

In an earlier post in this series, I discussed how both the economics and disruption associated with the wholesale replacement of existing IT systems makes it infeasible under most circumstances. In their answer to this question, Mary and Gary highlight the need for these existing systems to work together with new applications. As they put it: “Much of the success of cloud-native applications will depend on how well conventional systems can integrate with modern applications and support the integration and performance requirements of cloud-native developers.”

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How cloud-native needs cultural change

This is the third in a series of posts that delves deeper into the questions that IDC’s Mary Johnston Turner and Gary Chen considered in a recent IDC Analyst Connection. The third question asked:

How will IT management skills, tools, and processes need to change [with the introduction of cloud-native architectures]?

Mary and Gary note that the move to hybrid architectures “switches the IT operations team’s priorities from maintaining specific components to ensuring the delivery of end-to-end services measured in terms of service-level agreements (SLAs).” They also note that there’s a huge cultural element. For example, “Line-of-business stakeholders will have to partner with IT operations and development staff, either individually or as part of collaborative DevOps groups, to ensure that services are implemented as expected and that test-and-release cycles are well integrated.

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Evolving IT architectures: It can be hard

This is the second in a series of posts that delves deeper into the questions that IDC’s Mary Johnston Turner and Gary Chen considered in a recent IDC Analyst Connection. The second question asked:

What are the typical challenges that organizations need to address as part of this evolution [to IT that at least includes a strong cloud-native component]?

In their response, Mary and Gary note the challenges associated with “having to integrate with conventional systems can slow down the entire process and work against the agile, continuous integration/continuous delivery methodologies these DevOps teams often employ.” At the same time, this integration can’t be dispensed with; they add that “IDC expects cloud-native and conventional applications to become more connected and interdependent over time.” (Check out the recent webinar discussing this and other topics: Next-generation IT strategies: Mixing conventional and cloud-native infrastructure–based on a recent IDC survey.)

So, where does that leave us? Is traditional IT destined to just be a boat anchor when it’s integrated with cloud-native IT? (And make no mistake, integration is an inevitability.)

Variations of this question also come up as part of critiques to the bimodal or two-speed IT idea.

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Does cloud-native have to mean all-in?

This is the first in a series of posts that delves deeper into the questions that IDC’s Mary Johnston Turner and Gary Chen considered in a recent IDC Analyst Connection. The first question asked:

Cloud-native application architectures promise improved business agility and the ability to innovate more rapidly than ever before. However, many existing conventional applications will provide important business value for many years. Does an organization have to commit 100% to one architecture versus another to realize true business benefits?

As Mary and Gary write, there are indeed “cost and performance benefits of greenfield, extreme scale cloud-native applications running on highly standardized, automated infrastructure.” However, as they also note, bringing in the bulldozers to replace all existing infrastructure and applications isn’t an option for very many businesses. There’s too much investment and, even if it were an option financially, the disruption involved in wholesale replacement would likely offset any efficiency gains.

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OpenStack Summit Tokyo – Final Summary

 

As I flew home from OpenStack Summit Tokyo last week, I had plenty of time to reflect on what proved to be a truly special event. OpenStack gains more and more traction and maturity with each community release and corresponding Summit, and the 11th semi-annual OpenStack Summit certainly did not disappoint. With more than 5,000 attendees, it was the largest ever OpenStack Summit outside of North America, and there were so many high quality keynotes, session, and industry announcements, I thought it made sense to put together a final trip overview, detailing all of the noteworthy news, Red Hat press releases, and more.

As always, the keynotes were much-anticipated and informative. The day 1 keynotes started with Jonathan Bryce, the Executive Director of the OpenStack Foundation provided a nice welcome speech, and an overview of what attendees could expect in the next three days. He was then followed on stage by technologists from various organizations focusing on real-world use cases, including Egle Sigler from Rackspace, and Takuya Ito from Yahoo, who shared their experience and use case with OpenStack at Yahoo Japan.

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