Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 is here! So what’s new?

UPDATE Jan 16th: new OSP10 + CEPH 2 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Reference Architecture

It’s that time of the year. We all look back at 2016, think about the good and bad things, and wish that Santa brings us the gifts we deserve. We, at Red Hat, are really proud to bring you a present for this holiday season: a new version of Red Hat OpenStack Platform, version 10 (press release and release notes). This is our best release ever, so we’ve named it our first Long Life release (up to 5 years support), and this blog post will show you why this will be the perfect gift for your private cloud project.

red-hat-openstack-platform-10

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 is here! So what’s new?”

Proven OpenStack solutions. Simple OpenStack deployment. Powerful results.

According to an IDC global survey sponsored by Cisco of 3,643 enterprise executives responsible for IT decisions, 69% of respondents indicated that their organizations have a cloud adoption strategy in place. Of these organizations, 65% say OpenStack is an important part of their cloud strategy and had higher expectations for business improvements associated with cloud adoption.1

Organizations are looking to OpenStack to enable DevOps, add flexibility to their infrastructure, improve cost controls, avoid vendor lock-in and optimize hybrid private/public cloud deployments. One of the ways Red Hat is helping customers adopt OpenStack and achieve these goals is through our collaboration with other IT industry leaders, including Cisco. Red Hat and Cisco are helping customers implement a Fast IT. Many of our customers are interested in what OpenStack has to offer and they are looking to what Cisco and Red Hat can offer to simplify complexity, get up and running faster and build a foundation to enable scaling and High Availability (HA).

Continue reading “Proven OpenStack solutions. Simple OpenStack deployment. Powerful results.”

An ecosystem of integrated cloud products

In my prior post, I described how OpenStack from Red Hat frees  you to pursue your business with the peace of mind that your cloud is secure and stable. Red Hat has several products that enhance OpenStack to provide cloud management, virtualization, a developer platform, and scalable cloud storage.

Cloud Management with Red Hat CloudForms            

CloudForms contains three main components

  • Insight – Inventory, Reporting, Metrics red-hat-cloudforms-logo
  • Control – Eventing, Compliance, and State Management
  • Automate – Provisioning, Reconfiguration, Retirement, and Optimization

Continue reading “An ecosystem of integrated cloud products”

Red Hat, Nuage Networks, OpenStack, and KISS

Nuage Networks logo

RHOSCIPN_logo_small

The reality is that IT is serious money – IDC estimates that the Internet of Things (IoT) market alone will hit $7.1 trillion by 2020![1]  But a lot of that money is due to the IT industry practice of “lock-in” – trapping a customer into a proprietary technology and then charging high costs, in some instances up to 10X cost, for every component   For some reason, customers object to having to pick one vendor’s approach, being subject to limitations – whether technological or otherwise, paying high markups for every incremental extension, then having to pay high switching costs for the next solution at end of life in five years or less.

As a consequence, many of those customers are taking a good, hard look at open source software (OSS) that can minimize vendor lock-in. OSS communities also encourage the development of software solutions that run on industry-standard and reasonably priced hardware. In particular, OpenStack has been well received by businesses of all sizes, and the OpenStack community is growing by leaps-and-bounds with 625% more participating developers and 307% more business members as of its fourth birthday![2] Since OpenStack can orchestrate operations for an entire datacenter, it offers a vision of the future where  customers are free from server, network, and storage lock-in.

However, legacy naysayers have always articulated three catches with OSS:
1)    Making it enterprise-grade in terms of scalability, reliability, and security
2)    Ensuring that the code base grows over time so that others can move the ball forward
3)    Getting enterprise-class support for the code base

Continue reading “Red Hat, Nuage Networks, OpenStack, and KISS”