Introduction to Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director

Those familiar with OpenStack already know that deployment has historically been a bit challenging. That’s mainly because deployment includes a lot more than just getting the software installed – it’s about architecting your platform to use existing infrastructure as well as planning for future scalability and flexibility. OpenStack is designed to be a massively scalable platform, with distributed components on a shared message bus and database backend. For most deployments, this distributed architecture consists of Controller nodes for cluster management, resource orchestration, and networking services, Compute nodes where the virtual machines (the workloads) are executed, and Storage nodes where persistent storage is managed. general

The Red Hat recommended architecture for fully operational OpenStack clouds include predefined and configurable roles that are robust, resilient, ready to scale, and capable of integrating with a wide variety of existing 3rd party technologies. We do this with by leveraging the logic embedded in Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director (based on the upstream TripleO project).

With Director, you’ll use OpenStack language to create a truly Software Defined Data Center. You’ll use Ironic drivers for your initial bootstrapping of servers, and Neutron networking to define management IPs and provisioning networks. You will use Heat to document the setup of your server room, and Nova to monitor the status of your control nodes. Because Director comes with pre-defined scenarios optimized from our 20 years of Linux know-how and best practices, you will also learn how OpenStack is configured out of the box for scalability, performance, and resilience.

Why do kids in primary school learn multiplication tables when we all have calculators? Why should you learn how to use OpenStack in order to install OpenStack? Mastering these pieces is a good thing for your IT department and your own career, because they provide a solid foundation for your organization’s path to a Software Defined Data Center. Eventually, you’ll have all your Data Center configuration in text files stored on a Git repository or on a USB drive that you can easily replicate within another data center.

In a series of coming blog posts, we’ll explain how Director has been built to accommodate the business requirements and the challenges of deploying OpenStack and its long-term management. If you are really impatient, remember that we publish all of our documentation in the Red Hat OpenStack Platform documentation portal (link to version 8).

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Learn what’s coming in OpenStack “Mitaka”

As the fastest growing open source project in history, OpenStack releases fairly rapidly, with new releases twice per year. Each time, around April and October of every year, a whole plethora of new features and functions move from incubated development status to fully-baked features and accepted into the “core” OpenStack release. Rapidly approaching is the new “Mitaka” release, the 13th release of OpenStack, filled with some great new features.

To best share all the updates, we’ve put together a webinar to explain everything in much greater detail. These webinar’s provide you the opportunity to hear from our senior product managers, as well as ask questions about anything that might peak your own interest. To give you an idea of what exactly will be covered, here are some key highlights we’ll be talking about:

Compute

  • Support for Real-time KVM compute nodes and custom CPU thread policies for use by latency-sensitive NFV guest applications.
  • Improvements to the reliability of live migration to assist with application management and resiliency.
  • Progress update on Cells V2 implementation for improved scalability.

Storage

  • Support for rolling upgrades in Cinder, through backwards compatible RPC and versioned object pinning.
  • New Attached Volumes Extend API was introduced in Cinder, as well as new download/upload support for Cinder volumes in Glace repository.
  • New Disaster Recovery Share-Replication API support in Manila and improved Cinder Replication v2.1 API.

Networking

  • Continuing the work on distributed virtual routers (DVR)
  • Tenant resources cleanup
  • Improved Security Groups performance

In addition we’ll be sure to cover the state of key emerging projects including Barbican, Freezer, Manila, and Magnum, and provide some initial thoughts on what we might expect to see as we look forward to the “Newton” release cycle.

Don’t miss this “What’s New” update about the Mitaka release from two of our senior product managers, Steve Gordon and Sean Cohen. To learn more and register for this webinar, please be sure to  register here.

 

Boosting the NFV datapath with RHEL OpenStack Platform

With software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) gaining traction, more cloud service providers are looking for open solutions, based on standardized hardware platforms and open source software. In particular, communication service providers (CSPs) are undergoing a major shift from specialized hardware-based network elements to a software based provisioning paradigm where virtualized network functions (VNFs) are deployed in private or hybrid clouds of network operators. Increasingly, OpenStack is seen as the virtual infrastructure platform of choice for NFV, with many of the world’s largest communications companies implementing solutions with OpenStack today.

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