“Ultimate Private Cloud” Demo, Under The Hood!

At the recent Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, and more recently the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, the OpenStack engineering team worked on some interesting demos for the keynote talks.

I’ve been directly involved with the deployment of Red Hat OpenShift Platform on bare metal using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director deployment/management tool, integrated with openshift-ansible. I’ll give some details of this demo, the upstream TripleO features related to this work, and insight around the potential use-cases.

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A modern hybrid cloud platform for innovation: Containers on Cloud with Openshift on OpenStack

Market trends show that due to long application life-cycles and the high cost of change, enterprises will be dealing with a mix of bare-metal, virtualized, and containerized applications for many years to come. This is true even as greenfield investment moves to a more container-focused approach.

Red Hat® OpenStack® Platform provides a solution to the problem of managing large scale infrastructure which is not immediately solved by containers or the systems that orchestrate them.

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Highlights from the OpenStack Rocky Project Teams Gathering (PTG) in Dublin

Last month in Dublin, OpenStack engineers gathered from dozens of countries and companies to discuss the next release of OpenStack. This is always my favorite OpenStack event, because I get to do interviews with the various teams, to talk about what they did in the just-released version (Queens, in this case) and what they have planned for the next one (Rocky).

If you want to see all of those interviews, they are on YouTube at:

(https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOuHvpVx7kYnVF3qjvIw-Isq2sQkHhy7q) and I’m still in the process of editing and uploading them. So subscribe, and you’ll get notified as the new interviews go live.

In this article, I want to mention a few themes that cross projects, so you can get a feel for what’s coming in six months.

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The interview chair. Photo: Author

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Red Hatters To Present at More Than 50 OpenStack Summit Vancouver Sessions

OpenStack Summit returns to Vancouver, Canada May 21-24, 2018, and Red Hat will be returning as well with as big of a presence as ever. Red Hat will be a headline sponsor of the event, and you’ll have plenty of ways to interact with us during the show.

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Heading to Red Hat Summit? Here’s how you can learn more about OpenStack.

Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and we’re excited to share all the ways in which you can connect with OpenStack® and learn more about this powerful cloud infrastructure technology. If you’re lucky enough to be headed to the event in San Francisco, May 8-10, we’re looking forward to seeing you. If you can’t go, fear not, there will be ways to see some of what’s going on there remotely. And if you’re undecided, what are you waiting for? Register today

Continue reading “Heading to Red Hat Summit? Here’s how you can learn more about OpenStack.”

An Introduction to Fast Forward Upgrades in Red Hat OpenStack Platform

OpenStack momentum continues to grow as an important component of hybrid cloud, particularly among enterprise and telco. At Red Hat, we continue to seek ways to make it easier to consume. We offer extensive, industry-leading training, an easy to use installation and lifecycle management tool, and the advantage of being able to support the deployment from the app layer to the OS layer.

One area that some of our customers ask about is the rapid release cycle of OpenStack. And while this speed can be advantageous in getting key features to market faster, it can also be quite challenging to follow for customers looking for stability.

With the release of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 in December 2016, we introduced a solution to this challenge – we call it the Long Life release. This type of release includes support for a single OpenStack release for a minimum of three years plus an option to extend another two full years. We offer this via an ELS (Extended Life Support) allowing our customers to remain on a supported, production-grade OpenStack code base for far longer than the usual 6 month upstream release cycle. Then, when it’s time to upgrade, they can upgrade in-place and without additional hardware to the next Long Life release. We aim to designate a Long Life release every third release, starting with Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 (Newton).

Now, with the upcoming release of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 (Queens), we are introducing our second Long Life release. This means we can, finally and with great excitement, introduce the world to our latest new feature: the fast forward upgrade.

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Using Ansible for Fernet Key Rotation on Red Hat OpenStack Platform 11

In our first blog post on the topic of Fernet tokens, we explored what they are and why you should think about enabling them in your OpenStack cloud. In our second post, we looked at the method for enabling these

Fernet tokens in Keystone are fantastic. Enabling these, instead of UUID or PKI tokens, really does make a difference in your cloud’s performance and overall ease of management. I get asked a lot about how to manage keys on your controller cluster when using Fernet. As you may imagine, this could potentially take your cloud down if you do it wrong. Let’s review what Fernet keys are, as well as how to manage them in your Red Hat OpenStack Platform cloud.

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Photo by Freddy Marschall on Unsplash

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform 12 Is Here!

We are happy to announce that Red Hat OpenStack Platform 12 is now Generally Available (GA).

This is Red Hat OpenStack Platform’s 10th release and is based on the upstream OpenStack release, Pike.

Red Hat OpenStack Platform 12 is focused on the operational aspects to deploying OpenStack. OpenStack has established itself as a solid technology choice and with this release, we are working hard to further improve the usability aspects and bring OpenStack and operators into harmony.

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With operationalization in mind, let’s take a quick look at some the biggest and most exciting features now available.

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Enabling Keystone’s Fernet Tokens in Red Hat OpenStack Platform

As we learned in part one of this blog post, beginning with the OpenStack Kilo release, a new token provider is now available as an alternative to PKI and UUID. Fernet tokens are essentially an implementation of ephemeral tokens in Keystone. What this means is that tokens are no longer persisted and hence do not need to be replicated across clusters or regions.

“In short, OpenStack’s authentication and authorization metadata is neatly bundled into a MessagePacked payload, which is then encrypted and signed as a Fernet token. OpenStack Kilo’s implementation supports a three-phase key rotation model that requires zero downtime in a clustered environment.” (from: http://dolphm.com/openstack-keystone-fernet-tokens/)

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An Introduction to Fernet tokens in Red Hat OpenStack Platform

Thank you for joining me to talk about Fernet tokens. In this first of three posts on Fernet tokens, I’d like to go over the definition of OpenStack tokens, the different types and why Fernet tokens should matter to you. This series will conclude with some awesome examples of how to use Red Hat Ansible to manage your Fernet token keys in production.

First, some definitions …

What is a token? OpenStack tokens are bearer tokens, used to authenticate and validate users and processes in your OpenStack environment. Pretty much any time anything happens in OpenStack a token is involved. The OpenStack Keystone service is the core service that issues and validates tokens. Using these tokens, users and and software clients via API’s authenticate, receive, and finally use that token when requesting operations ranging from creating compute resources to allocating storage. Services like Nova or Ceph then validate that token with Keystone and continue on with or deny the requested operation. The following diagram, shows a simplified version of this dance.

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Courtesy of the author

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