Virtualize your OpenStack control plane with Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

With the release of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 (Queens) we’ve added support to Red Hat OpenStack Platform director to deploy the overcloud controllers as virtual machines in a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This allows you to have your controllers, along with other supporting services such as Red Hat Satellite, Red Hat CloudForms, Red Hat Ansible Tower, DNS servers, monitoring servers, and of course, the undercloud node (which hosts director), all within a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This can reduce the physical server footprint of your architecture and provide an extra layer of availability.

Please note: this is not using Red Hat Virtualization as an OpenStack hypervisor (i.e. the compute service, which is already nicely done with nova via libvirt and KVM) nor is this about hosting the OpenStack control plane on OpenStack compute nodes.

Video courtesy: Rhys Oxenham, Manager, Field & Customer Engagement

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform: Making innovation accessible for production

An OpenStack®️-based cloud environment can help you digitally transform to succeed in fast-paced, competitive markets. However, for many organizations, deploying open source software supported only by the community can be intimidating. Red Hat®️ OpenStack Platform combines community-powered innovation with enterprise-grade features and support to help your organization build a production-ready private cloud.

Through an open source development model, community leadership, and production-grade life-cycle options, Red Hat makes open source software more accessible for production use across industries and organizations of any size and type.

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Photo by Omar Albeik on Unsplash

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform: Two life-cycle choices to fit your organization

OpenStack®️ is a powerful platform for building private cloud environments that support modern, digital business operations. However, the OpenStack community’s six-month release cadence can pose challenges for enterprise organizations that want to deploy OpenStack in production. Red Hat can help.

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Photo by elizabeth lies on Unsplash

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 is here!

Accelerate. Innovate. Empower.

In the digital economy, IT organizations can be expected to deliver services anytime, anywhere, and to any device. IT speed, agility, and innovation can be critical to help stay ahead of your competition. Red Hat OpenStack Platform lets you build an on-premise cloud environment designed to accelerate your business, innovate faster, and empower your IT teams.

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Red Hat Certified Cloud Architect – An OpenStack Perspective – Part Two

Previously we learned about what the Red Hat Certified Architect certification is and what exams are included in the “OpenStack-focused” version of the certification. This week we want to focus on personal experience and benefits from achieving this milestone.

Let’s be honest, even for the most skilled engineers the path to becoming an RHCA can be quite challenging and even a little bit intimidating!  Not only do the exams test your ability to perform specific tasks based on the certification requirements, but they also test your ability to repurpose that knowledge and combine it with the knowledge of other technologies while solving extremely complex scenarios.  This can make achieving the RHCA even more difficult; however, it also makes achieving the RHCA extremely validating and rewarding.

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Photo by Samuel Clara on Unsplash

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform fast forward upgrades: A step-by-step overview

New in Red Hat®️ OpenStack®️ Platform 13, the fast forward upgrade feature lets you easily move between long-life releases, without the need to upgrade to each in-between release. Fast forward upgrades fully containerize Red Hat OpenStack Platform deployment to simplify and speed the upgrade process while reducing interruptions and eliminating the need for additional hardware. Today, we’ll take a look at what the fast forward upgrade process from Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 to Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 looks like in practice.

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There are six main steps in the process:

  1. Cloud backup. Back up your existing cloud.
  2. Minor update. Update to the latest minor release.
  3. Undercloud upgrade. Upgrade your undercloud.
  4. Overcloud preparation. Prepare your overcloud.
  5. Overcloud upgrade. Upgrade your overcloud.
  6. Convergence. Converge your environment.

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Red Hat Certified Cloud Architect – An OpenStack Perspective – Part One

The Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA) is the highest certification provided by Red Hat. To many, it can be looked at as a “holy grail” of sorts in open source software certifications. It’s not easy to get. In order to receive it, you not only need to already be a Red Hat Certified Engineer  (RHCE) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (with the Red Hat Certified System Administrator, (RHCSA) as pre-requisite) but also pass additional exams from various technology categories.

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There are roughly 20 exams to choose from that qualify towards the RHCA. Each exam is valid for 3 years, so as long as you complete 5 exams within a 3 year period, you will qualify for the RHCA. With that said, you must keep these exams up to date if you don’t want to lose your RHCA status.

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Using Ansible for Fernet Key Rotation on Red Hat OpenStack Platform 11

In our first blog post on the topic of Fernet tokens, we explored what they are and why you should think about enabling them in your OpenStack cloud. In our second post, we looked at the method for enabling these

Fernet tokens in Keystone are fantastic. Enabling these, instead of UUID or PKI tokens, really does make a difference in your cloud’s performance and overall ease of management. I get asked a lot about how to manage keys on your controller cluster when using Fernet. As you may imagine, this could potentially take your cloud down if you do it wrong. Let’s review what Fernet keys are, as well as how to manage them in your Red Hat OpenStack Platform cloud.

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Photo by Freddy Marschall on Unsplash

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Red Hat OpenStack Platform 12 Is Here!

We are happy to announce that Red Hat OpenStack Platform 12 is now Generally Available (GA).

This is Red Hat OpenStack Platform’s 10th release and is based on the upstream OpenStack release, Pike.

Red Hat OpenStack Platform 12 is focused on the operational aspects to deploying OpenStack. OpenStack has established itself as a solid technology choice and with this release, we are working hard to further improve the usability aspects and bring OpenStack and operators into harmony.

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With operationalization in mind, let’s take a quick look at some the biggest and most exciting features now available.

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Enabling Keystone’s Fernet Tokens in Red Hat OpenStack Platform

As we learned in part one of this blog post, beginning with the OpenStack Kilo release, a new token provider is now available as an alternative to PKI and UUID. Fernet tokens are essentially an implementation of ephemeral tokens in Keystone. What this means is that tokens are no longer persisted and hence do not need to be replicated across clusters or regions.

“In short, OpenStack’s authentication and authorization metadata is neatly bundled into a MessagePacked payload, which is then encrypted and signed as a Fernet token. OpenStack Kilo’s implementation supports a three-phase key rotation model that requires zero downtime in a clustered environment.” (from: http://dolphm.com/openstack-keystone-fernet-tokens/)

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